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lenox
5th February 2009, 09:27 PM
Well, I've lived here since 1967 and have had a residence card since around 1970 - a white thing, then a red thing, then a snappy little version of the Spanish Documento Nacional de Indentidad... but tomorrow, after 40 years under Franco, Spain's amusing version of democracia and European partnership, I am booked in to the Almería immigration authority where my residencia will be scissored and trashed.
So much for that.
Instead of my handy little card, with my tax number, drivers' licence number and ID number all rolled into one, together with a representation of my pulgar and a full colour picture, so useful for flashing with the Mastercard or withdrawing a few bob at a caja de ahorros, I will be issued with an A4 letter which will tell anyone who cares to read it - until I've folded it a few times and it's fallen to bits - that my tax number is such and such and that, together with my passport, I am legal and a respected member of our citizenry.
So- 40 years a resident and now a tourist again.

Ben
5th February 2009, 10:10 PM
Doesn't bare thinking about... I love my little ID card, and can't imagine it being changed for a stupid bit of paper. When mine runs out, I'm thinking of becoming Spanish so I can get a similarly-sized and useful DNI card. Can I do that? I think I can... really, I'd do it just to keep that wonderfully handy little card!

Legazpi
6th February 2009, 12:42 AM
My tarjeta de residencia expires in April and I'm already being reminded what a nightmare it is to deal with Spanish bureaucracy. I tried phoning them today to find out what I need to do - but the phone was permanently engaged, not even a queueing system.

I'm hoping that all I need to do is show up somewhere once, fill in a form, and then they'll post me the letter. Somehow I doubt it'll be that simple.

It's not just carrying the letter around that'll be a hassle, UK nationals will have to carry their passports with them the whole time as well, since they won't have their own ID cards. Apparently it is the EU that has forced this change through.

Culebronchris
6th February 2009, 12:58 AM
And the real fun is that most Spaniards don't recognise (in the sense that they don't appreciate what it is) the green bit of paper so that they ask for the NIE paperwork instead

lenox
6th February 2009, 05:49 AM
Legazpi - I asked a friend in France and another in Italy - neither of them have this A4 plus passport crap. The Brit resident in France has a 'carte de sejour' from the police (with a photograph, therefore legal identity) and the Italian system is similar.
It is all down to not having any political identity. Displaced Europeans don't have a voice in Brussels (or, evidently, in Madrid). This is the 21st century vision of Europe - walking around with a useless bit of A4 paper?

Ben
6th February 2009, 08:58 AM
Serioulsy, does anyone know if I, as someone that has been resident for 10 years, and married to a Spanish person, can get dual nationality or a DNI? I think I can, but no idea how it works... anyone know anything? Mentioned it on the blog too (http://www.notesfromspain.com/2009/02/06/becoming-residentdual-nationality-in-spain/) to see what answers might turn up there...

Legazpi
6th February 2009, 09:57 AM
lenox - I can't remember where I read it, maybe even on this forum, but someone said that Spain was meant to have phased out the tarjeta de residencia quite a while back, because they weren't meant to be issuing ID cards to foreigners from other EU countries, and the EU gave them a ticking off for not having phased them out before. However this does indeed appear inconsistent with how you say it works in France and Italy. Maybe the "carte de sejour" is not officially an ID card, but recognised as such for most day-to-day stuff. Also I'm not sure if you need to carry your ID with you in France anyway, I recall not having to produce any ID when paying by credit card in France.

In the past I have used my Spanish driving license as ID when paying by credit card, and it hasn't been a problem. So I'm hoping I can carry that around instead of my passport. Does anybody know if you can officially use your driving license as ID? I guess I'll have to get a plastic cover to protect that certificate, like the ones you used to get with the old paper UK driving license.

Kyla
6th February 2009, 10:01 AM
Hi Ben. You definitely can. But I don´t think Spain recognises dual nationality. To be eligible you need to be resident in Spain for at least 10 years and you certainly qualify for that. I´m not sure about the process.

Legazpi
6th February 2009, 10:09 AM
Serioulsy, does anyone know if I, as someone that has been resident for 10 years, and married to a Spanish person, can get dual nationality or a DNI? I think I can, but no idea how it works... anyone know anything? Mentioned it on the blog too (http://www.notesfromspain.com/2009/02/06/becoming-residentdual-nationality-in-spain/) to see what answers might turn up there...

AFAIK Spain does not recognise dual nationality, but the UK does. If you took Spanish nationality you'd have to renounce your UK nationality to the Spanish crown, and you'd be as Spanish as Marina. However I'm not sure whether that necessarily means that the UK will stop recognising you as a UK citizen:confused:. If you become a Spanish citizen there will be other implications, such as your last will and testament will be subject to Spanish law.

Ben
6th February 2009, 11:07 AM
Comment from Sam on the blog:

Deleted - Sam found out he was wrong :(

ValenciaSon
6th February 2009, 11:30 AM
My father has dual citizenship (Spain and the US), I know Spain recognizes his status because they pay him a monthly pension.

rod
6th February 2009, 11:44 AM
As far as I understand it, Spain does not recognise dual nationality except in certain cases. Towards the end of last year these were extended as part of the historical memory legislation to include descendants of civil war refugees and, it seems (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/oct/11/spain-military), International Brigade veterans who had fought in the civil war.

Ben
6th February 2009, 12:02 PM
Update, had to delete quote from Sam above, turns out he discovered he was wrong about still being able to get a card :(

fawlty
6th February 2009, 12:39 PM
I believe Spain is still being pursued in the European Courts for its actions contrary to European law with regard to Residency.

Apparently the Spanish Authorities are acting illegally by requiring people to attend National Police Stations to obtain the Residents Certificate. They should be issued by local authorities, similar to Padron Certificates. Nor should they make any charge, they should not require people to disclose certain details, for example, parents names. Anyone interested in this subject would find the link below interesting reading.

http://www.ukgovabusesexpats.co.uk/E.U.%20Directives/Directive2004-38-EC_04-06-08-report.php

Personally, having had the Residents Certificate since 2007, I have had no problem using my Spanish Driving Licence as ID. Interestingly, it is now apparently (in theory) illegal for offcials to demand production of a Residents Card (EU Citizens). Having said that, if you want to get things done, you have to run with the current system.

I suppose eventually Spain will comply.

If any EU citizen is thinking of taking up Spanish Nationality, I think you should seek specialist advice first. There are many issues involved, for example State Pension rights etc.

Hope this helps.

By the way, the British Expats Association, (who published the information in the above link) has now disbanded.

Ben
6th February 2009, 04:44 PM
I think I'll just have to go with the piece of paper, and for day to day purposes carry my driving license around. How annoying they took away our NIE cards... I wonder why?

midnightgolfer
6th February 2009, 04:47 PM
Sorry, this is a bit unhelpful for Brits, but as a U.S. citizen, married to a Spaniard, I was able to get a NIE card.
It's looks a little bit like my wife's DNI card.
It required several trips to various government offices.
It also required the acknowledgement that phone calls and website sites still don't get you anywhere in this country. There always seems to be some major glitch.
The only way I was able to do it was to stand in many lines, some of which wrapped around the building, or the entire block, and it took over six months from the time we started (the same week we arrived from the U.S.)
I had to be added to her Libro de Familia, which meant I had to get a recent marriage certificate sent to us from the state where we got married, plus the Seal of the Hague. Luckily we had a friend that was nice enough get that done for us, as it otherwise would have required a flight back to the States.
After we got our marriage recognized by Spain, and got me added to her 'family book' we then waited for confirmation by mail, and then went and stood in line again to actually sign for and get the card itself. I know there were a couple of steps in there that I missed, but my case is pretty unique, as I'm not from the E.U. and my residency is contingent upon my marriage to a native.
Anyways, I was then able to get my driver's license, as Spain no longer recognises D.L.'s from any of the states, and I just recently got to take the green "L" out of the rear window.

Is there no universal EU ID card?

switch007
6th February 2009, 06:18 PM
Is there no universal EU ID card?
The EU isn't a single country (yet :rolleyes:). I wouldn't like to think of the bureaucracy involved with a single ID card. It would also happen over a few peoples dead bodies. Or when hell freezes over :)

lenox
6th February 2009, 06:21 PM
Well - I went to the Almería extranjería office (zipped through the special door for whites - I'm not kidding) and was whisked by a gestoría contact to my fate. They took away my residencia, photocopied my passport, told me the printer for the A4 was bust and waved me good-day. I am - in theory - eyedee-less at this moment.
Why have you taken away our residence card, I asked.
It's all to do with Europe... our hands are tied... well, each country can do what it wants... (and finally) it was to stop the Romanians and Bulgarians getting residencias.

In our case down here in Almería, we will be given a reduced photocopied version of the A4 which will be plastificated to be carried in our wallets and, together with our trusty passpoprt, we will be (sort of) legal.

'In the ninth year of the twenty-first century, in a European country...'

Ben
6th February 2009, 07:16 PM
it was to stop the Romanians and Bulgarians getting residencias.Madre mia... speechless at the solution they came up with!

rod
6th February 2009, 07:59 PM
Having arrived since the card was withdrawn I've been already been through the process and have the certificate in front of me. It clearly states on it, twice, just in case you miss it the first time: 'Aviso: documento no válido para acreditar la identidad ni la nacionalidad del portador'.

So it doesn't prove your nationality or identity and it also doesn't prove your place of residence, because you don't have to supply any prove of your place of residence when you apply. The basic residency certificate, ie for those who have been in Spain less than five years, is nothing more than a certificate of having registered in the register of foreigners.

So my question is: can anyone provide a link to an authoritative source confirming that you have to have your certificate with you at all times as has been suggested :confused:.

I've had mine nearly a year and I have difficulty remembering any occasion when it was specifically asked for.

Ben
6th February 2009, 09:07 PM
So basically it is a total waste of paper and time and pretty much useless! Great exchange for an invaluable piece of documentation you can't get any more because someone decided to stick it to the Romanians and Bulgarians, even if it meant screwing up every other european in the process! ....... still amazed......

Acosta
6th February 2009, 11:07 PM
This sounds quite confusing,

What about someone who wants to live and work in spain for an extended period of time (1-2 years), what do they have to do now?

Culebronchris
6th February 2009, 11:40 PM
The piece of paper isn't really useless. It's just no use to us. It's purpose is to try and count the number of EU nationals living in Spain.

The reasoning behind abandoning the "Residencia" card was that the old process made EU citizens have to comply with Spanish law in relation to carrying proof of identity. The EU didn't like one member state trying to foist it's laws onto citizens of other member states. HM Government already issues a document which allows Brits to prove our identity should we need to - it's our passport. Thats why the green A4 thingy is not an ID document and why it's called a registration certificate of citizenship of the union.

Odd that it arouses such a lot of "pro" passion. I've got used to proving who I am at the Mercadona checkout but I've never liked it and I am completely against the issuing of identity cards. I shouldn't have to prove to some pub manager or cinema ticket tearer that I'm old enough to see a film or buy booze. The fact that it's possible, in much of the World, to take out a mobile phone contract, open a bank account or use a credit card without having first to go to a police station and get fingerprinted proves it can be done.

Maybe our complaint should not be about the piece of paper but about being asked to prove who we are. Alternatively what about a campaign to get marriage certificates turned into a handy plastic cards so those of us who are married can prove our status should a hotel clerk require it?

lenox
7th February 2009, 09:38 AM
Or how about those pesky Spaniards making us drive on the right?

The 'Tarjeta de Residencia' fits in your wallet (right next to the Mastercard), is useful at the doctor's (I can locate it right next to my Tarjeta Sanitaria), it helps me vote, get documents from the town hall, get a mortgage and identify myself to the police and/or the post office.
It has my photo on it, is written in Spanish, has my address and my tax number.
What is not to like?
Now I feel like the Ministerio del Interior (run by that champion of democracy Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba - he who stopped the local elections for Europeans in 1999) is taking the piss.
Other European countries continue to give photographic identity documents to their European 'guests' ('Carte de Séjour' etc). Here we have the drivers licence which has a picture, one's NIE number, but not an address. Some supermarkets accept it as proof of ID, others apparently don't. Banks don't.
Lastly, since this 'law' has slipped in without any fanfare - most officials in Spain have not heard of it and are dumbfounded to be presented with a bit of paper with blandishments from Rubalcaba's gang written on it. In Spanish. Especially in Catalonia!!
And please don't say that the European Govt is doing something for the many millions of displaced Europeans that are scattered around Europe - because they aren't.

Pippa
7th February 2009, 09:53 AM
Culebronchris:

I prefer to carry my identity card or even a passport (although it is some years now since I have not had one) than having to prove who I am in England by the gas bill or a bank statement, or even four or five of those (as you have to provide in England when you need a police record) The police record is now required for an awful lot of jobs, and even my mother in law was asked for one because she helps in church!
And that happens in a Bank, in the local sport club and in many other situations, to the point that I used to carry around a household bill in case I needed it for proof of address, except that I had to change it every three months. At least the DNI is for ten years. And I do not object to showing it with a credit card, at least it should decrease fraud in these situations.

gtappend
7th February 2009, 10:28 AM
I'm just booking my flights for the GME and I've spotted something interesting in the small print on the Spanair website.

It might be of interest to those of you still with NIEs that haven't run out yet:

Please, note: The former NIE card is not a valid document for the resident's discount. You need the new Registration Certificate (Certificado de Registro) to benefit from the discount.
So even if your NIE is still valid at the moment, they apparently won't accept it anymore!

rod
7th February 2009, 01:28 PM
I've had mine nearly a year and I have difficulty remembering any occasion when it was specifically asked for.

Actually I'm doing the certificate an injustice. I now remember I needed it to change my bank account from 'non-residents' to 'residents'. I don't think I could have done that any other way. Also there have been other occasions where I handed it over along with a bunch of other documents, it may have essential but I don't know: for example, when I went to the notary to make a will.

fawlty
7th February 2009, 04:22 PM
I think that if you need to do any official business, for example anything involving a Notary, or applying for a Spanish Driving Licence, Health Card etc. then you will have to produce the Residency Certificate.

Whilst on the subject of Notaries. If you need to prove fiscal residency in Spain, in order to take advantage of tax breaks available to residents, for example Inheritance Tax, then the Residency Certificate itself is not enough. You will also need to produce your last three years Spanish Tax Returns. This is worth bearing in mind, because if you are in theory exempt from submitting a tax return to the Hacienda, for example if your income is low, it could be worth submitting one anyway, even though it may be a negative return. That way you can prove fiscal residency.

ribeirasacra
7th February 2009, 06:06 PM
The card was stopped as pointed out, because of a EU ruling. The issuing of a card was challenged by some Brits living on the Costas. They thought that as the UK does not have ID cards then we should not either. But I have now read that that group dose not exist and the website has been parked.
Thanks a lot guys. I want and love my card. I now need to carry my passport everywhere to prove who I am even to use my CC.
All other countries in the EU issue cards, so why not Spain I wish there was an option as to what you want issued plastic or paper!

Xativa_David
7th February 2009, 06:53 PM
I must be missing something. We´ve used scaled down plasticised copies of our UK passports as ID for years, with our NIE numbers printed on the back. Never gets queried. For a Notary or something seriously official, we take our proper passports. Never had a residencia, nor its replacement. When I went to the local Policia Nacional about the EU residency certificate, the officer said "There´s no such thing"; when pressed, he called his pal in the extranjeria who confirmed he´d never heard of it. "If you can identify yourself when I stop you in the street, and you´re on the Padron (we are), what´s the problem?" he said. I went off to get a cold beer.

I know it´s nice to feel you´ve got all your paperwork in order just the way it´s supposed to be, but I for one am not going to burn my brain out trying to keep up with something my local bobby hasn´t even heard of and certainly won´t enforce. We know we officially exist, because the Policista Local stopped us in the street the other day to fill in the EU election forms (voting in Spain/voting in country of origin).

Of course, local practice may vary...

David Millen
www.fincacasablanca.com

gtappend
7th February 2009, 07:51 PM
All other countries in the EU issue cards, so why not Spain I wish there was an option as to what you want issued plastic or paper!

Actually, that is not quite correct. Germany, for example, only issues the plastic ID cards to their citizens but not to their residents.

I have an unrestricted and theoretically unlimited residence permit to live there (it's about the size of 3 passport pages - see this photo (http://www.themondaypodcast.com/blog/index.php/indoor-podcasts/moving-to-germany/)), but in practise I have to renew it every 10 years because the passport on it has to be the same as the one in my passport. (To make matters more complicated, the German idea of how to cut out a bio-metric photo is slightly different to the British one, so the photos are not quite identical!)

However, if I want to do anything official, like register my address or open a bank account the I need to produce my passport. To get married I even had to produce proof of income and get a county court judge to approve the marriage first!

Of course, this means that the passport gets a certain amount of use and after a few years this begins to show. At passport control in Calais (the British bit) Her Majesty's official even once made a comment about this, because the gold lettering on the front cover was becoming barely readable.

I had hoped that one day we might adopt the Spanish scheme here so that I could have a type of NIE. Sadly, it looks like the opposite will be the case. :(

My (German) wife has none of this hassle - she has her ID card.

greytop
7th February 2009, 09:27 PM
.... When I went to the local Policia Nacional about the EU residency certificate, the officer said "There´s no such thing"; when pressed, he called his pal in the extranjeria who confirmed he´d never heard of it. ....

Of course, local practice may vary...

...You might get away with it where you are but see the Madrid UK embassy site (http://ukinspain.fco.gov.uk/en/help-for-british-nationals/living-in-spain/residence-req) for the official line.

"EU citizens From 28 March 2007, Royal Decree 240/07 requires that all EU citizens planning to reside in Spain for more than three months should register in person at the Foreigner's Office (Oficina de Extranjeros ..) in their province of residence or at designated Police Stations (http://www.mir.es/SGACAVT/extranje/directorio.html). However, they will no longer be issued with a residence card. Instead they will be issued a Residence Certificate stating their name, address, nationality, identity number and date of registration.
EU citizens who already have valid residency cards need take no action until their card expires. On expiry they too must register at the Oficina de Extranjeros or designated police stations.
EU citizens must apply in person within 3 months of entry into Spain by presenting a valid passport, completing an application form and paying a fee."


If you want the Spanish Ministerio del Interior site its here (http://www.mir.es/SGACAVT/extranje/ciudadanos_UE/)

gary
8th February 2009, 12:12 AM
Is there no universal EU ID card?

...Brits are fighting tooth and nail NOT to have an ID card for the UK let alone lumping us in with "Johnny Foreigner"...

I have a mobile phone and a credit card - if they're sending in the black helicopters they'll have no trouble finding me...

I'd probably volunteer for a card that was my bank card, drivers licence and passport all in one - then lose it!!

Xativa_David
8th February 2009, 12:31 AM
[quote=greytop;70006]You might get away with it where you are but see the Madrid UK embassy site (http://ukinspain.fco.gov.uk/en/help-for-british-nationals/living-in-spain/residence-req) for the official line.

Yes, I did actually quote at least some of that (in Spanish) to the nice policeman. Might as well have been reading the weather forecast. Totally relaxed and amiable about it, though!

I may even try again when I have some time on my hands.

David Millen
www.fincacasablanca.com (http://www.fincacasablanca.com)

MCP
9th February 2009, 03:56 PM
When your residence permit reaches its expiry date, is it illegal not to apply for one of the new bits of paper, if you are resident here?

rod
9th February 2009, 04:32 PM
When your residence permit reaches its expiry date, is it illegal not to apply for one of the new bits of paper, if you are resident here?

Yes, it is definitely illegal.

markoCR
10th February 2009, 01:34 PM
I was given my tarjeta de residencia in November and was given the A4 piece of paper. Yet it seems that Americans are given a very handy card which slips right into their wallets. And of course now if I am ever asked for my tarjeta de residencia (which I obviously don't carry around with me, it's not like I can fold it up and put it in my pocket) people get annoyed when I say I don't have it on me.

From what I understand, they don't do dual nationality here and if I want a DNI I have to relinquish my British passport. Um... no thanks.

I'm guessing that also means that if I have kids with my girlfriend (who's Spanish), they're only going to be allowed to have a Spanish passport? Seems a bit silly really.

Legazpi
10th February 2009, 04:43 PM
I was given my tarjeta de residencia in November and was given the A4 piece of paper. Yet it seems that Americans are given a very handy card which slips right into their wallets. And of course now if I am ever asked for my tarjeta de residencia (which I obviously don't carry around with me, it's not like I can fold it up and put it in my pocket) people get annoyed when I say I don't have it on me.

tarjeta means "card" so you might be causing confusion by telling people you have a residency card, when in fact what you have is a certificate. The Americans quite possibly can still get the tarjeta de residencia, since it supposedly conflicts with EU rules, not US rules.

From what I understand, they don't do dual nationality here and if I want a DNI I have to relinquish my British passport. Um... no thanks.

I'm guessing that also means that if I have kids with my girlfriend (who's Spanish), they're only going to be allowed to have a Spanish passport? Seems a bit silly really.

You can give your kids Spanish nationality and then get the UK to grant them dual nationality afterwards. The Spanish authorities won't recognise the dual nationality, just their Spanish nationality, but who cares? As long as both countries recognise them as citizens of some sort, they should get the associated privileges. However, for the kids to be granted dual nationality by the UK, it probably helps a lot if one of their parents is a UK citizen. Which is a reason for you not to give up your UK nationality.

BTW my father was born in India, my mother in Sri Lanka, I was born in the UK, and my wife is Spanish. I don't dare work out what possible combinations of nationality are available to me!

imc
10th February 2009, 09:06 PM
Hola,

Creo que alguien ha preguntado por los trámites que hay que seguir para adquirir la nacionalidad española.

Podéis consultar la web del Ministerio de Justicia: http://www.mjusticia.es/ (http://www.mjusticia.es/cs/Satellite?c=Page&cid=1057821035133&lang=es_es&pagename=Portal_del_ciudadano%2FPage%2FHomeJustici a) ; toda la información se encuentra en el apartado Trámites Personales - Nacionalidad - Paso a Paso. Aquí se indican los plazos de residencia, documentación, etc. que se necesitan según las circunstancias de cada uno.

La solicitud se presenta en el Registro Civil que corresponda a tu lugar de residencia.

lenox
16th February 2009, 06:04 PM
Ten days later - still haven't got my greenish A4 with the stamps so that I can wheel it around wherever I go together with my EUROPEAN passport.

Presumably, the printer at the immigration office in Almería is still broke.
Come along now you Sr Rubalcaba, wake up! :party:
So, I am still an 'un-person'. sigh.

Lotuspc
9th March 2009, 05:52 PM
Here is my account of aquiring my certificado. Needed after you are in spain for more than 90 days)

After many attempts at getting through by phone to the office in Almeria I eventually got through and was given an appointment for a months time. They told me to bring my passport only.

I had attempted to get empadronamiento locally but couldn´t without the NIE number (http://www.viva-almeria.com/nie_number_p3450.php).

I had a month to read up on the requirements which asked for the required form to be filled out - and have 2 copies.
I also printed out a copy of my passport as also requested .

On the instructions there are no more requirements than this.

I duly printed out the map of where to find the new offices in Almeria and off we went. Found it without any problem but parking is a bit of a nightmare.

Our appointment at 11.30 was logged and we waited around 20 mins in a busy waiting room which I have to say was clean and organised.

We went in to the desk shown on the screen and tried to assess the friendliness of our officer...
I presented my 2 copies of the form and my passport and its copy.... and he asks.-
do you have enpadronamiento? NO you can´t without NIE
do you have a phone contract with your address on - NO (you can´t without an NIE)
do you have anything with an address on? - YES we luckily had our rental contract but that appeared on inspection not to have the street on it - so no good.

At this he just shrugged his shoulders....

Time to play my trump card... my partner is a Guardia Civil and gave your man a nod and a wink. The official flashed us his police badge and then suggested that we go to a local bank and open an account with the address we wanted then come back with the bank documents as evidence - and at the same time we could pay the 10 euro fee.

So... off we went to the BanCaja and opened an account in my name with just a passport. (You can´t do THAT in the UK).
The girl there was very helpful - no doubt charmed by my lovely Guardia man. I got a signed document with the address - paid the fee and went back to the Office.
No wait this time - straight up to our man who was by now all smiles.

We left with my Certificado, valid for 5 years and some new best friends.

I would recommend that you take some evidence of your address and a piece of paper from a bank is the quickest way to get one.
I also recommend you take a spanish person with you - preferably one who can charm the birds from trees - in spanish.

I hope this helps anyone who is applying for the first time http://www.viva-almeria.com/modules/Forums/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif
Sorry I can´t loan out my spanish man http://www.viva-almeria.com/modules/Forums/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Kyla
10th March 2009, 10:12 AM
I also recommend you take a spanish person with you - preferably one who can charm the birds from trees - in spanish.

I hope this helps anyone who is applying for the first time http://www.viva-almeria.com/modules/Forums/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif
Sorry I can´t loan out my spanish man http://www.viva-almeria.com/modules/Forums/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Ha ha! Yes, you´re quite right! My lovely Spanish partner has helped me to obtain all my documentation. I don´t know what I´d have done without him. :)

LizJ
24th March 2009, 12:05 PM
Jumping on to this thread from a slightly different angle. We are not EU citizens (Australian) so face a few more obstacles than most. My partner lives fulltime in Spain and has a residencia. I work outside Spain most of the year and therefore do not qualify for the ´have to live there more than 6 months of the year´box. At some point when I work less I plan to get the residencia.

My understanding - both from this thread and some research - is that after 10 years of being a resident my partner can become an EU citizen - if so desired, with the proviso that he would have to give up his Australian citizenship. That point and therefore decision is some years off and I gather that it is expected Spain might fall into line with other EU countries and allow dual citizenship. Austalia allows dual citizenship.

Regardless of whether I have residencia at that point or not, does anyone know if that gives me automatic right to Spanish /EU citizenship, simply by marriage? Or does my clock keep ticking, so to speak?

MCP
15th January 2010, 11:50 AM
I had to get one of these stupid bits of paper a couple of months back as when buying a flat we were informed that the notary would need one...this in spite of the fact that I have no end of documentation showing that I am resident and pay my taxes here in Spain. But rules is rules, and I had no choice except to queue up from about 5 in the morning to get my piece of paper...

On a semi-related note, has anyone else had any problems in entering any particular Spanish official websites, for example Telefónica, because it tells you that your NIE number isn't valid? The "X" at the beginning of my number seems to cause the problem. We had the same problem at the bank when doing the mortgage agreement; the "X" had to be replaced in the bank's own computer system by a "0" but in the case of Telefónica this hasn't worked...