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Old 12th October 2010, 04:51 PM   #1
Stephen
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Default Weird different meanings of a verb

Entablar

1. to put down floorboards on (suelo)
2. to strike up (iniciar) (conversación, amistad)
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Old 12th October 2010, 05:18 PM   #2
Angelo
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Hi Stephen

2- This verb is never written alone. It needs a direct object (any term related to "conversation","chat",...)
"¿Quieres entablar una conversación ahora mismo?"
"Los jóvenes de aquel colegio suelen entablar charlas con los alumnos de esta escuela"

1- When you use the verb without an object, it takes the first meaning.
"Se ha roto el piso de la sala. Voy a entablarlo y mañana lo repararé"

"¿Quieres entablar ahora mismo?", (it may sound a little odd, if the context is not the correct one)

Last edited by Angelo; 12th October 2010 at 05:46 PM.
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Old 13th October 2010, 07:32 PM   #3
Angelo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelo View Post
Hi Stephen

2- This verb is never written alone. It needs a direct object (any term related to "conversation","chat",...)
"¿Quieres entablar una conversación ahora mismo?"
"Los jóvenes de aquel colegio suelen entablar charlas con los alumnos de esta escuela"

1- When you use the verb without an object, it takes the first meaning.
"Se ha roto el piso de la sala. Voy a entablarlo y mañana lo repararé"

"¿Quieres entablar ahora mismo?", (it may sound a little odd, if the context is not the correct one)
I'm sorry, I forgot "Entablar una amistad"
"Se conocieron hace un par de años, y entablaron una gran amistad. Desde entonces, son inseparables"
I'd like to make one thing clear: entablar is a transitive verb. It requires a direct object. That's how we distinguish first meaning and second meaning.

1- If possible, write it with a direct object. It helps a lot.
"Voy a entablar el techo"
"Voy a entablar un negocio"
The more information you say, the clearer the sentence will be.
http://es.thefreedictionary.com/entablar

Last edited by Angelo; 13th October 2010 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 14th October 2010, 03:57 AM   #4
drew21close
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
Entablar

1. to put down floorboards on (suelo)
2. to strike up (iniciar) (conversación, amistad)

I thought suelo means soil.

iniciar means start, conversacion means conversation and amistad means friendship.
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Old 14th October 2010, 06:52 PM   #5
Angelo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drew21close View Post
I thought suelo means soil.

iniciar means start, conversacion means conversation and amistad means friendship.
Yes, it does mean soil. And it often means floor, too. But to connotate the dirtyness(?) of floor.
"No comas ese sándwich. Se cayó al suelo"
Or ground...
"Tropezó y cayó al suelo"
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/t...asp?spen=suelo

Quote:
to put down floorboards on (suelo)
I think that's only one example (about a not-built-yet terrain), because a floor or a roof can also be "entablado"
http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltCons...&LEMA=entablar


Yes, correct

Last edited by Angelo; 15th October 2010 at 04:40 AM.
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Old 15th October 2010, 01:35 AM   #6
Lise
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelo View Post
Yes, it does mean soil. And it often means floor, too. But to indicate the dirtiness of the floor.
I thought 'suelo' was the standard word for 'floor' ? Could there be a difference between Castilian and Argentinian Spanish ?

Last edited by greytop; 15th October 2010 at 07:57 AM. Reason: quote mark added
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Old 15th October 2010, 07:38 AM   #7
drew21close
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They usually use suelo for floor but it really means soil or ground.
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Old 15th October 2010, 08:51 PM   #8
Pippa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lise View Post
I thought 'suelo' was the standard word for 'floor' ? Could there be a difference between Castilian and Argentinian Spanish ?
You are right, Lise, suelo is the standard for floor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drew21close View Post
They usually use suelo for floor but it really means soil or ground.
Suelo has a few meanings, three of them are floor, ground and soil.
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Old 16th October 2010, 05:09 AM   #9
xan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drew21close View Post
They usually use suelo for floor but it really means soil or ground.
I expect it really means both things. It´s just one of those interesting cases where one language habitually makes a distinction that the other one doesn´t, or where one language thinks more generically than the other.

A few other similar cases that have struck or surprised me:
  • puerta is both "door" and "gate"
  • escalera is both "stairs" and "ladder"
  • puerto is both "pass" (as in a mountain pass) and "port" (as in seaport)
  • manija, mango, manivela, asa are all just "handle" in english
  • mochuelo, buho, lechuzo, autillo are all different kinds of owl in english. There is not really a generic word "owl" in spanish. You would have to say something wordy like ave rapaz nocturna to capture the meaning.
  • querer is both "want" and "love"
  • señor is both "mister" and "lord" as in "our lord jesus"
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