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Old 18th January 2007, 11:31 AM   #41
omeyas
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Boring as it is to have to look up so many words, I think it's essential rather than guessing the meanings. Sometimes you'll be correct, others times you could be badly wrong. Rescate does not mean playground, AFAIK, but the rest you have guessed fairly well. You wouldn't have found "descampao" as the word should be "descampado" (waste ground) they have written it as they speak it ie. dropping the "D", as in supermercao"
As for frenazo, anything ending in azo in Spanish, has increased value, or a blow with something, as in bastazo, codazo etc. So as you say, frenar is to brake, and even without the "tan brutal", a frenazo would mean heavy braking.
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Old 18th January 2007, 02:10 PM   #42
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Tad - I know exactly what you mean and I agree with the lovely omeyas (he is lovely) that it's worth looking up all the words. I know all the 'advice' is that you don't; that you just go with the flow, but it always helped me.

When I started off reading the bolsilibros I kept them tucked inside a small dictionary so it was easy to have a quick look. Then, when my vocabulary improved, I dispensed with the ever-present dictionary and just made a note of the odd word/expression and looked it up later.

I found that when I started I translated everything in my head. Now I don't. I never worried too much about grammar/tenses etc and why things were written the way they were. I remember (one of the many times) when I was trying to get to grips with the subjunctive I made a special effort to recognise subjubctive uses when I was reading.

On reflection, the real benefits to me with reading in Spanish have been a) improved vocabulary and b) the way in which I have unconsciously learned about sentence construction and use of tenses. Now I normally don't have to think twice about how something should be said - it just seems so natural, and that must be down to the reading.

So don't give up. Keep reading regularly - 4-5 pages each day is better than a 20-page burst every now and then. You will get better and you will notice the other benefits from regular reading.
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Old 18th January 2007, 08:28 PM   #43
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Thanks for the help (grammatical and motivational) guys. El deano your literary forays have compelled to get me to pick up the second Potter (y la cámara secreta) which I have. I'm trying for a more reasoned approach-not checking everything (I think you can get away with it Frank if you are familiar with the story anyway-from the film, although I take your point). The things I'm getting the most benefit from are phrases that I read and can work out- but are not how I would have translated it.

e.g. just from the last page I'm on
La temperatura descendía a cada paso que daban. (dar un paso)

Or the day to day type speech that reinforces dull grammar-

Oh, no dijo Hermione, parándose de repente-. Volvamos, volvamos, no quiero hablar con Myrtle la Llorona. ( just the use of volvamos in a natural setting i.e. instead of thinking first person plural imperative type of thoughts!)

cheers tad
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Old 18th January 2007, 08:42 PM   #44
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Always happy to help.

As you seem to be comfortable (at the moment) with books where you've also seen the film, maybe you'll have a stab at El Señor de los anillos or even Parque Jurásico.

Don't forget to let us know how you get on and those words/expressions that you come across.
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Old 23rd January 2007, 09:14 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldeano View Post
Edith, you've convinced me. I'll start on Cien años de soledad tonight. Look out for regular updates and grammatical 'hurdles'.

I'm working my way through Cien años de soledad and I´m enjoying it (Edith) and I see what you mean about José Arcadio and Buendía. I´ve not come across any interesting phrases yet but I've found some strange words:

daguerrotipo
tarabiscoteado
currutaco


Any thoughts?
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Old 24th January 2007, 01:29 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldeano View Post

I'm working my way through Cien años de soledad and I´m enjoying it (Edith) and I see what you mean about José Arcadio and Buendía. I´ve not come across any interesting phrases yet but I've found some strange words:

daguerrotipo
tarabiscoteado
currutaco


Any thoughts?
tarabiscoteado (from an interview with Gabriel Garcia Marquez):
Argos: -¿Qué palabras le has aportado al idioma?
GGM: -Tengo dos palabras que provienen del francés porque no les encontré un equivalente preciso en castellano: una es tarabiscoteado, que apliqué a un personaje de Cien Años do Soledad, llamado dosé Arcadio (El Tatuado). Quería referirme a algo abigarrado de tatutajes, pero más lleno en unos sitios que en otro, y no encontré nada mejor que ese verbo que no figura en el diccionario. Otro verbo es capitonear, porque no encontraba apropiado decir acolchar o bastear un mueble, palabras que resultan muy débiles. Puede ser que me acusen de galicismo pero hay casos en que lo importante es que se sepa lo que yo quiero decir.
Y hay otra linda palabra que uso en El Coronel: amorines. En italiarxo amorino quiere decir Cupido, aquel angelito que lanza flechas a los enamorados. Encontré que amorines ftuye con el mismo sentido en castellano.

From www.rae.es:

daguerrotipo:
http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltGUIB...po&TIPO_HTML=2
curructaco-a:
http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltGUIB...co&TIPO_HTML=2
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Old 24th January 2007, 10:03 AM   #47
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Sean - you're a wonder. Who needs RAE when you're available?
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Old 24th January 2007, 12:04 PM   #48
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I've just looked back at the awkward words from the last 5 books that I've read - to check against my super-dictionary, and the following do not even appear in that (or word reference).

Chamán
el tronzador - I think it's something like double-headed saw/axe
el acárido

Harry Potter
el jerbo - gerbil?
rediez

Any help appreciated.

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Old 24th January 2007, 02:48 PM   #49
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Tronzador.
1. m. Sierra con un mango en cada uno de sus extremos, que sirve generalmente para partir al través las piezas enterizas

http://www.juegostradicionalesaragon...s/picador3.jpg

el acárido
acárido, da.1. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a los ácaros.2. m. pl. Zool. Orden de estos animales..
ácaro.(Del lat. cient. acărus, y este del gr. ἄκαρι).1. m. Zool. Arácnido de respiración traqueal o cutánea, con cefalotórax tan íntimamente unido al abdomen que no se percibe separación entre ambos. Esta denominación comprende animales de tamaño mediano o pequeño, muchos de los cuales son parásitos de otros animales o plantas.2. m. pl. Zool. Orden de estos animales.ORTOGR. Escr. con may. inicial.

Rediez
rediez.1. interj. eufem. rediós.
rediós.1. interj. Denota enfado, cólera, sorpresa, etc.


Last edited by omeyas; 24th January 2007 at 02:54 PM.
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Old 24th January 2007, 03:08 PM   #50
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Omeyas - Many thanks - you are still very lovely. Where did you get the definitions from?
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Old 24th January 2007, 04:38 PM   #51
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Default Ya tengo ganas de leer Cien An~os de nuevo.

Primero, perdonenme por no usar accentos, y ~. Uso una computadora ajena, y no puedo cambiar el keyboard.

Voy a volver a "Cien an~os de soledad." Lo he leido en ingles, y ya tengo ganas de leerlo en castellano, gracias a ustedes (vosotros). Perdonenme, aprendi mi espanol en sudamerica, asi no uso vosotros con confianza.

Para mi, los libros de Isabel Allende me han sido lo mas divertidos de leer en catellano. Son del mismo genero de la literatura como los libros de Gabrial Garcia Marquez...magical realism. (in spanish?).

Last edited by DocMolly; 24th January 2007 at 04:41 PM.
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Old 24th January 2007, 04:51 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocMolly View Post
Primero, perdonenme por no usar accentos, y ~. Uso una computadora ajena, y no puedo cambiar el keyboard.
Have you tried using the ALT key? Does this help?

Quote:
Voy a volver a "Cien an~os de soledad." Lo he leido en ingles, y ya tengo ganas de leerlo en castellano, gracias a ustedes (vosotros).
Good for you. I hope you enjoy it as much as I am currently. Follow Edith's advice and keep pen and paper happy to keep track of all the Aurelianos and Arcadios.

Quote:
Para mi, los libros de Isabel Allende me han sido lo mas divertidos de leer en catellano. Son del mismo genero de la literatura como los libros de Gabrial Garcia Marquez...magical realism. (in spanish?).

Next time I'm in Spain I'll get some Isabel Allende books. Any particular ones you can recommend?
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Old 26th January 2007, 03:35 AM   #53
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My favorites were Eva Luna y La Casa de los Espíritus, y me gustó el primero más. Isabelle Allende es de Chile.

Quote:
Follow Edith's advice and keep pen and paper happy to keep track of all the Aurelianos and Arcadios.
I plan to copy the family tree from the front cover of the book and keep it handy. Thanks for this great thread.
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Old 31st January 2007, 03:41 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldeano View Post

I'm working my way through Cien años de soledad and I´m enjoying it
OK. Cien años de soledad is back in the bookcase. I've really enjoyed it (especially the ending) even though I did get confused with all the Aurelio's etc. However, it didn't have the cut and thrust of the books I normally read.

As usual, I didn't look every word I didn't know - unless I thought it was vital to the story - and made a note (on my bookmarks) of those that cropped up more than once, to save me constantly looking the same word up. Those that weren't in my small dictionary I noted down to look up later. I've got about 30 to look up this evening. I will be looking for help with those that I can't find in the (so-called) super-diccionario.

Then I'll have to select the next book
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Old 1st February 2007, 09:47 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldeano View Post
I've got about 30 to look up this evening. I will be looking for help with those that I can't find in the (so-called) super-diccionario.
OK.

atarván
crotaloteo
menjunje
piedralipe
bienorragia
pauladismo


and these two I´m unlikely to meet again

jarapellinoso
jerosolimitano


Now onto Cubridle el rostro - PD James.
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Old 2nd February 2007, 11:47 PM   #56
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re looking up stuff in the dictionary, some guy on his podcast had the idea of every time you look up a word mark that word, first with say a circle,then coloured in circle then whatever system you want. I guess if you've had to look a word up 4-5 times you know
1. it's common usage
2. figure a way to remember it better

like most of the good ideas I post here I haven't actually tried it myself
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Old 3rd February 2007, 04:31 PM   #57
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Well, I think we need a native speaker for this, but this these are my adivinaciones

Quote:
Originally Posted by eldeano View Post
crotaloteo: from crotalo = rattler, rattlesnake
menjunje: from word mejunje: mixture, brew, fraud, fiddle
piedralipe: something to do with piedra?
bienorragia: it looks like this would be something like happiness, does that fit with context
pauladismo: from paular: to chat?
I just started cien años...but don't expect me to write back any time soon that I've finished it. I love it, but I think it's going to take me awhile to finish. The language is so beautiful, I can't help but read things over and over again.

With regards to looking up words. I downloaded ultralingua dictionary to my palm pilot, and it's a quick and easy way to look up words, without having to page through a book.
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Old 3rd February 2007, 06:34 PM   #58
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Thanks for your help, Doc, and congrats on getting those pesky Spanish characters sorted.

Crotaloteo - I think it's referring to teeth chattering in the cold, so it fits with 'rattle'.
Piedralipe appears in una píldora del color del piedralipe. Bienorragia - I've just realised it's blenorragia - ooops! Pauladismo seems to be a complaint /illness (of the human kind).
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Old 5th February 2007, 06:45 PM   #59
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Default Paludismo

Pues. Ahora estoy en un café leyendo "Donde no hay doctor" como preparacón para irme a Honduras mañana y me acabo de dar con la palabra "paludismo" que en este libro se refiere a malaria.
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Old 5th February 2007, 06:57 PM   #60
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Quote:
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Pues. Ahora estoy en un café leyendo "Donde no hay doctor" como preparacón para irme a Honduras mañana y me acabo de dar con la palabra "paludismo" que en este libro se refiere a malaria.
Top girl, DM. Why are you reading Donde no hay doctor? I thought you were still on Cien años?
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