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Old 23rd January 2009, 01:09 PM   #1
fawlty
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Default La palabra ´jolin´

Has anyone come across this word (it may have an accent over the i)

I hear it used quite a lot in my area. It seems to be used as an expression of surprise like ´you´re joking´

I was talking to the Spanish owner of my local bar about it and she said it was an expression from the Bilbao area.

My grandson, who is only 8, but a native Spanish speaker tells me it is ´una palabra rota´ (swear word), but the bar owner says not.

I can´t seem to find the word in any dictionaries, or the usual translation sites.
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Old 23rd January 2009, 01:31 PM   #2
Juanjo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fawlty View Post
Has anyone come across this word (it may have an accent over the i)

I hear it used quite a lot in my area. It seems to be used as an expression of surprise like ´you´re joking´

I was talking to the Spanish owner of my local bar about it and she said it was an expression from the Bilbao area.

My grandson, who is only 8, but a native Spanish speaker tells me it is ´una palabra rota´ (swear word), but the bar owner says not.

I can´t seem to find the word in any dictionaries, or the usual translation sites.
My dictionary of slang says that it is a mild way of swearing (jolín=joder) just like "Oh shoot!" or "Christmas!" or as a very religious friend used to say when extremely annoyed "Great Brass BUCKets!".
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Old 23rd January 2009, 01:51 PM   #3
delgado
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as Juanjo says "jolín" is a mild way of saying "joder" , sometimes used by children to avoid inciting the wrath of their parents.

Other forms that you might hear are (these ones are more often used by adults to avoid swearing)...



Joer

Joé

These can also be used to exagerate statements ....

Eg. ¡Joer tío, es que me encanta esta canción! (holy s%%t dude, I love this song!) etc....


Hope this helps!!

Last edited by delgado; 23rd January 2009 at 01:59 PM.
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Old 23rd January 2009, 02:22 PM   #4
Legazpi
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"Jolín" is an exclamation quite commonly used in Madrid - Dolly Parton even wrote a song based on it.
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Old 23rd January 2009, 02:28 PM   #5
Juanjo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Legazpi View Post
"Jolín" is an exclamation quite commonly used in Madrid - Dolly Parton even wrote a song based on it.
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Old 23rd January 2009, 03:30 PM   #6
fawlty
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Thank you all for your assistance.

Legazpi-Thank you for keeping me abreast of the situation.
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Old 24th January 2009, 08:07 PM   #7
Korben
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Indeed, jolín is widely used (mostly by kids) and is a mild form of "joder", which is an interjection that one can use almost anywhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fawlty View Post
My grandson, who is only 8, but a native Spanish speaker tells me it is ´una palabra rota´ (swear word), but the bar owner says not.
This made me chuckle. A swear word is a "palabrota" (which means "a big word"), no a "palabra rota", which would be a broken word
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Old 6th February 2009, 01:40 AM   #8
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I'm loving being back on the forum, you read some of the best and funniest things.

I was living with a Spanish family and the kids used jolin a lot.

Joer for me is still joder, it just means they're dropping the D like the English drop their Ts.

In my experience in Madrid many people were dropping Ds to the point where I have started doing it a lot

" He Habla'o con el pero no me ha manda'o na'a"
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