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Old 27th October 2010, 06:46 PM   #1
cronos
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Default Hay?

Hi all,

Just a quick question over something that's been puzzling me a bit. Hay means 'there is' or 'there are', but in the verb tables for haber in my dictionary it doesn't list hay at all. Why is not ha ? How do you arrive at hay ? Does this happen with any other verbs ?

Thanks
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Old 27th October 2010, 07:59 PM   #2
Angelo
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Hi cronos,
'hay' means both "There is" and "There are". It is an impersonal form of verb 'haber' (to show the existence of objects, people, beings,...), so that's why it is not affected by gender or number, and we use 'hay' instead of 'ha'*

Hay un gato sobre la mesa -----> There is a cat on the table
Hay una ardilla cerca del árbol -----> There is a squirrel near the tree

Hay tres manzanas en la heladera -----> There are three apples in the
¡Hay mucha gente aquí! ----> There are too many people here
¡Hay muchas personas aquí! ----> There are too many people here

But it is affected by time.
Hubo un terremoto ---> There was an earthquake
Hubo varios terremotos ---> There were several earthquakes
Si hubiese más árboles, habría menos polución del aire---> If there was more trees, there would be less air pollution



* http://www.wordreference.com/conj/EsVerbs.asp?v=haber
él, ella, Ud: ha; impersonal: hay

Other uses of 'haber' http://culturitalia.uibk.ac.at/hispa...hab%C3%ADa.htm
http://www.belcart.com/belcart_es/como_esc/c_haber.html

Last edited by Angelo; 27th October 2010 at 08:11 PM.
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Old 28th October 2010, 08:42 AM   #3
Ajo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelo View Post
Hi Angelo

I see that the tables you mention give Imperatives for haber,

habe (tú)
habed (vosotros)

But the RAE Dictionary

http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltGUIVerbos?IDVERBO=6903

only knows an Imperative in tú (or vos),

he


Any idea what is going on?



_
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Old 28th October 2010, 01:12 PM   #4
Angelo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajo View Post
Hi Angelo

I see that the tables you mention give Imperatives for haber,

habe (tú)
habed (vosotros)

But the RAE Dictionary

http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltGUIVerbos?IDVERBO=6903

only knows an Imperative in tú (or vos),

he


Any idea what is going on?



_
Hi Ajo,
No, I meant the following form

INDICATIV
Presente
he
has
ha o hay
hemos
habéis / han
han
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Old 28th October 2010, 05:43 PM   #5
Ajo
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Yes, but I was asking a new question:

Are all of he, habe, habed currently in use as imperatives?

In Spain? In America?



_
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Old 28th October 2010, 06:06 PM   #6
Angelo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajo View Post
Yes, but I was asking a new question:

Are all of he, habe, habed currently in use as imperatives?

In Spain? In America?



_
I have never used them . They seem a bit arcaic.
(I don't know if they are used currently in Spain)
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Old 29th October 2010, 06:35 AM   #7
Pippa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajo View Post
Yes, but I was asking a new question:

Are all of he, habe, habed currently in use as imperatives?

In Spain? In America?


_
Habe y habed no se utiliza, como dice Angel , es arcaico, lo encontrarás en la literatura de Cervantes. "He" como imperativo, segunda persona tampoco se utiliza en lengua hablada.

Si te quieres liar un poco más...
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Old 29th October 2010, 08:42 AM   #8
Ajo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pippa View Post
Habe y habed no se utiliza, como dice Angel , es arcaico, lo encontrarás en la literatura de Cervantes. "He" como imperativo, segunda persona tampoco se utiliza en lengua hablada.

Si te quieres liar un poco más...

Gracias. Como en la película estoy completamente atado.

Por supuesto, no tengo ningunos ejemplos del uso de "he", excepto "he aquí". En inglés, si: "Have done with it!" es posible. ¡Y una buena idea también!
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