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Old 2nd December 2009, 10:28 PM   #1
La Podenquera
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Default I want Spanish idioms

One thing I have learned is that the spanish language is full of idioms and that they are totally ininteligible for a swede. I would therefor be very gratefull if you can post me common everyday idioms from Spain, not south america, and of course with an explanation.
For example I have been told not to tie up my dogs with sausage, not to throw trees on men, that my friend is a huge as the cathedral in Burgos (not many men would survive that in Sweden) and that I am both milk and beer ha ha ha not to mention all the bodyparts of men
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Old 3rd December 2009, 08:50 AM   #2
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Well, we could try and have an idiom of the day and all the equivalents, for example to tell somebody to go away (and do not take it personally) you can say:

Vete a tomar vientos
Vete a freir espárragos

anda y que te den
vete a la mierda

and being quite rude:

que te den por el culo
que te den por el saco.
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Old 3rd December 2009, 10:46 AM   #3
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Thank you Pippa
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Old 4th December 2009, 03:41 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pippa View Post
... ... ...
... ...and being quite rude:

que te den por el culo
que te den por el saco.
We could be even more rude... ... ...
Well, here you have some more:

Cuando el grajo vuela bajo...
es que hace un frío del carajo.

(frío del carajo= (and anything of the carajo) means something really big, or strong, or important)

This word is very rude, but we must admit that very very used in Spain.
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Old 4th December 2009, 05:05 PM   #5
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Here's some good ones: http://www.redargentina.com/refranes/ but i can't be 100% sure that they're all Spanish as they were found on redargentina and thus some may be typically Latin American, but a lot that i look at seem typically Spanish.

Also, this site is good for expressions and their origins etc: http://erasmusv.wordpress.com/lista-de-expresiones-espanolas/
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Old 5th December 2009, 06:49 PM   #6
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Can you please add an translation too. I prefer to know what I'm saying
I have a friend from Alicante and he is a master on always adding Idioms in his letters to me. But the problem I see is when I ask other spaniards to tell me what he means with it, I always get different answers.

For example this message: No tengo tiempo para nada.....pero los perros son mi pasión y tú un trén a punto de descarrilar............
I don't have time for anything.....but the dogs are my passion and you a train going to derail.

It is the entire message. I thought it ment that I was going to get as screwed as he when it comes to dogs. But a spanish lady said she would never use this expression for that. Another one who also lives in Alicante said he ment that I was going to have a nervous brakdown If not even you spaniards can agree on what the idioms means how on earth am i going to do it ha ha ha
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Old 5th December 2009, 06:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by La Podenquera View Post
... ...For example this message: No tengo tiempo para nada.....pero los perros son mi pasión y tú un trén a punto de descarrilar............
I don't have time for anything.....but the dogs are my passion and you a train going to derail.
...
Dear, this is the first time I hear that message. I really don´t know what it means. It sounds to me as the spanish expresion:
Dónde vas? Manzanas traigo.
We use it when we question someone about something and that person answers something that has anything to see with the question.
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Old 5th December 2009, 07:01 PM   #8
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Ha ha ha another explanation to add to my collection.
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Old 7th December 2009, 01:02 PM   #9
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I think the problem is sometimes these idioms are antiquated,
ie nobody uses them, or really knows them unless they're older. Like maybe your grandmother would have used it in 1950... so think about it if someone was to learn Swedish and start using expressions from the 1950s! You mightn't understand them.

For example in my spanish class these expressions came up: arrimar el ascua a su sardina = to look after no.1, and
no se puede nadar y guardar la ropa = you can't have it both ways

And about 4 Spanish natives i talked to had never heard of these expressions which really surprised me at the time. But sometimes these idioms may only be used in one autonomous state,
ie they may use it all the time in Andalusia, but never in Asturias.

Last edited by kev; 7th December 2009 at 01:05 PM.
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Old 8th December 2009, 07:12 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
I think the problem is sometimes these idioms are antiquated,
ie nobody uses them, or really knows them unless they're older. Like maybe your grandmother would have used it in 1950... ... ... ... ...ie they may use it all the time in Andalusia, but never in Asturias.
Hi, Kev.

Tell me please, of what idioms exactly are you talking about??
I can tell you for sure that the idioms I explained before are used in all Spain, not only in Andalucía... that by the way, is a very big part of Spain and all of his idioms are surely known in the rest of the country.
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Old 8th December 2009, 09:47 PM   #11
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I think he is talking in general Rubia. For example my train that is going to derail and every spanish speaking person gives me a new interpretation of it. There is no concecus of what it means. Or maybe it is just an invention of the author. I have a favourite too that I have always believed everyone understand. But they don't. Let see if you know what I mean with this expression.

At least once a day, take a lep from the edge of the carpet.

Or I can reply to a question like, Have you died your har?: Yes I took a leap from the edge of the carpet today.

Last edited by La Podenquera; 8th December 2009 at 09:50 PM.
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Old 8th December 2009, 10:51 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by La Podenquera View Post
... ...But they don't. Let see if you know what I mean with this expression.

At least once a day, take a lep from the edge of the carpet.

Or I can reply to a question like, Have you died your har?: Yes I took a leap from the edge of the carpet today.
Oh, my God, I´m afraid that I don´t know the meaning of that expression.... ni idea, hija mía!!!

Here it is one of my favourites:
- Culo veo... culo quiero.
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Old 8th December 2009, 11:33 PM   #13
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I subscribe to the RSS feed of http://www.likeaspaniard.com/ - you get several new idioms each week

(Edit: I know it looks like spam, but I just don't have anything else to comment on in the thread jeje)
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Old 9th December 2009, 08:06 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by La Rubia View Post
Oh, my God, I´m afraid that I don´t know the meaning of that expression.... ni idea, hija mía!!!

Here it is one of my favourites:
- Culo veo... culo quiero.
My expression is about those small changes in the life. You don't have to climb mount Everest. To take a leap from the edge of the carpet is sufficient. To do something new and unexpected. Not to do as you always do. If you always take the bus, try the train. If you always sleep on the right side of the bed, try the left side. Change the color of your hair or hairstyle. If we dare to try out new things every day our life gets more interesting and fun. To brake old habbits.

I see ass... I want ass! I hope it is a sexy ass then ha ha ha. I have no clue to when I'm suposed to use it ha ha ha
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Old 9th December 2009, 09:24 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by La Podenquera View Post
... ...
I see ass... I want ass! I hope it is a sexy ass then ha ha ha. I have no clue to when I'm suposed to use it ha ha ha

Good morning darling!!
Well, "culo veo... culo quiero" is used to those kind of people who doesn´s have their own opinion, and always are waiting for you to decide something, or buy something, or wear something new and inmediatly they do the same.

Another expression that I use a lot:
"Se creyó el ladrón que todo el mundo es de su condición", very easy to understand.
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Old 9th December 2009, 12:12 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by La Rubia View Post
Hi, Kev.

Tell me please, of what idioms exactly are you talking about??
I can tell you for sure that the idioms I explained before are used in all Spain, not only in Andalucía... that by the way, is a very big part of Spain and all of his idioms are surely known in the rest of the country.

Hola,

Pues no me referí a los modismos tuyos, sino en general (como La Podenquera dijo) porque queda muy claro que hay expresiones en cualquier idioma que con el traspaso de tiempo resulta anticuadas, o la gente sencillamente ya no se usa. Y mi punto era que aprendí en mi clase de español "no se puede nadar y guardar la ropa", luego en conversación con una chica de Galicia, lo usé porque tenía sentido en el punto que expresaba yo, y ella no tenía ni idea de que estaba diciendo! luego con esa otra expresión "arrimar el ascua a su sardina"; ¡no menos de 4 españoles no sabían esa expresión! Por eso hay expresiones que he aprendido que los españoles no saben.

Pues yo en mi clase de español aprendí un mogollón de modismos etcétera pero tuyos, es la primera vez que los he visto...
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Old 9th December 2009, 12:31 PM   #17
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Here's a good test for you Podenquera!: http://www.auladiez.com/ejercicios/modismos_cuerpo.html

^^ Some of these are very good and common expressions.

And more expressions: http://www.spanish-teaching.com/blog...2/2769128.html
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