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Old 25th April 2010, 02:42 PM   #21
greytop
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A few more examples from a Spanish blog

Esto no es para . (me) – Mi hermano está aquí. (my)
No nada de eso. (know) / bueno. (be) – Juan se fue a las seis. (himself)
Yo quiero estudiar. (do – emphatic, yes) – Si no viene María, no trabajo. (If)
te llamas Juan. (You) – Tu libro lo tengo yo. (Your)
¿Quieres o café? (tea) – Te quiero una barbarida. (you – object)
Él es uruguayo. (he) – El coche es nuevo. (the)
María aún no llegó. (yet) – Ella aun hizo los pasteles. (even)
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Old 25th April 2010, 02:58 PM   #22
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The only one of those I can't understand well for the life of me is when to write "aún" and when to write "aun." I learnt them as aún = still/yet, aun = even (remembering that the top of aun doesn't have an accent and is therefore "even" ), but saying that "aun" means even doesn't help me, because as far as I'm aware it's correct to write "aún así" as "even so/all the same" or "still," and "aún más/menos" for "even more/less."

I've tried reading WordReference discussions on the topic and can't grasp the written difference in some cases.

The other one that has me confused occasionally is the difference between sólo and solo, because someone said that the writing rules in Spanish have changed and you no longer have to use a graphic accent to differentiate between them in their meanings of "alone" and "just/only". Maybe it's along the lines of the accent in éste/ése/aquél no longer being mandatory after revisions to the rules by the RAE.
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Old 25th April 2010, 11:05 PM   #23
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[QUOTE=Grimace;88789]
Quote:
The only one of those I can't understand well for the life of me is when to write "aún" and when to write "aun." I learnt them as aún = still/yet, aun = even (remembering that the top of aun doesn't have an accent and is therefore "even" ), but saying that "aun" means even doesn't help me, because as far as I'm aware it's correct to write "aún así" as "even so/all the same" or "still," and "aún más/menos" for "even more/less."

I've tried reading WordReference discussions on the topic and can't grasp the written difference in some cases.
From la RAE:

Quote:
ORTOGR. Escr. con acento cuando pueda sustituirse por todavía. Aún ('todavía') está enfermo. En los demás casos, se escribirá sin tilde. Te daré 100 duros, y aun ('hasta') 200, si los necesitas. No tengo yo tanto, ni aun ('ni siquiera') la mitad.

Quote:
The other one that has me confused occasionally is the difference between sólo and solo, because someone said that the writing rules in Spanish have changed and you no longer have to use a graphic accent to differentiate between them in their meanings of "alone" and "just/only". Maybe it's along the lines of the accent in éste/ése/aquél no longer being mandatory after revisions to the rules by the RAE.
Forget about that because it is not necessary to write the accent anymore in these cases.

Again according to the RAE:

Quote:

solo2 o sólo.
1. adv. m. Únicamente, solamente.
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Old 5th May 2010, 09:14 PM   #24
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Si, Michel Thomas es un masetro perfecto para estudiantes aprende espanol.
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Old 6th May 2010, 01:49 AM   #25
duncan_m
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RojoSoulja View Post
Si, Michel Thomas es un masetro perfecto para estudiantes aprende espanol.
Creo que si!

Muchos tiempos vuelvo a mis MP3's de Michel Thomas y aprendo algo nuevo.

Duncan.
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Old 6th June 2010, 08:49 PM   #26
Uriel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blogger View Post
Hello Duncan, I don't know who Michel Thomas is, but he's got a philosophical streak which I like.

Anyway, he think he is making things more complex than they really are.

"Estado" is a noun, not a participle, in this case. It is true that it is a noun derived from a participle. Like "cociente" (= quotient) in maths, though nobody would try and link "cociente" to any boiling characteristic of the question. Well, perhaps Michel Thomas would.

The relationship with the verb is that an "estado" is a kind of entity (abstract of concrete) which could change, as an opposition to an essence (which is more related to the verb ser (< essere, in Latin).

So, when I am not feeling very well I could say: "No me encuentro en buen estado". But it is not definite, I hope it will change.

"Estado" (for a State) is a concept which developed with Modernity, to mean that a national entity could be represented by any shape people agreed on. So the UK is an "estado", as opposed to any identity or essence such as being English, Scottisch or Welsh... (I don't know if that is an essence in itself, but some people wish their roots were).

So, the Estado británico would survive even if the Scots decided to separate, because its shape is arbitrary; whereas Scotland would not subsist if the Scots all decided they would separate, because the essence (the people making it) would have vanished.

I accused Michel Thomas of making things complex, and I guess I might have messed things further up.
Dude, you don't know the mental contortions I go through to try to make logical connections that will make these things stick in my head! It's good to see other people struggle with this, too!

What always seems to puzzle me is that I often see sido where I expect to see estado. I've trained myself to always use estar with another verb -- Estoy trabajando. But this trick breaks down for me in the past tense.

Por ejemplo: In another post, somebody said ha sido eliminado. Now I'm thinking, okay -- have been eliminated. But eliminate is a verb, and eliminated is the past tense, so why isn't it ha estado eliminado? I think of have been eliminated as a verb in English, just like I have eliminated or I eliminated. But maybe my thinking about it this way is keeping me from understanding it correctly. Should I think of the past participle more as an adjective instead to try to determine the right auxiliary? Or is there another handy way to know?
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Old 7th June 2010, 01:13 AM   #27
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If you use ser with a past participle, it's usually because you're using the passive voice. The past participle agrees with the subject in this form of the passive.

Dos hombres fueron atropellados al cruzar la calle indebidamente (por un coche).
España ha sido eliminada del Mundial (por Honduras).

If you say "I have eliminated," that would be using the active voice, so it's different. You use a different auxiliary verb (haber) with the past participle and in this case it doesn't agree with the subject. (Yo he eliminado, ellas han eliminado).

So you would say:

"Honduras eliminó a España del Mundial."

Hope this helps.
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Old 7th June 2010, 02:07 AM   #28
Uriel
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I didn't understand at first, but then I looked up more about the passive voice and I understand what you are saying a little better. I had always just thought of those se this and se that verb constructions as a weird variety of reflexive verbs, not as having anything to do with ser. (Probably because the ser part only seems to happen in other tenses, not the present -- or does it?)
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Old 7th June 2010, 04:10 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uriel
Por ejemplo: In another post, somebody said ha sido eliminado. Now I'm thinking, okay -- have been eliminated. But eliminate is a verb, and eliminated is the past tense, so why isn't it ha estado eliminado? I think of have been eliminated as a verb in English, just like I have eliminated or I eliminated. But maybe my thinking about it this way is keeping me from understanding it correctly. Should I think of the past participle more as an adjective instead to try to determine the right auxiliary? Or is there another handy way to know?
Hello Uriel, I´m a new user. My presentation

As you have said "Have been eliminated", it may be traslated as "Ha sido eliminado"
In this tense, the verb "ser" in his participle form "sido" is always followed by participle. However, the participle of "estar", "estado" is followed by a verb in continuous form.

For instance:

-He sido despedido. (participle form "sido"+ other participle)
-Ha estado corriendo. (participle form "estado" + continuous form)
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Old 8th June 2010, 03:24 AM   #30
Uriel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julvenzor View Post
Hello Uriel, I´m a new user. My presentation

As you have said "Have been eliminated", it may be traslated as "Ha sido eliminado"
In this tense, the verb "ser" in his participle form "sido" is always followed by participle. However, the participle of "estar", "estado" is followed by a verb in continuous form.

For instance:

-He sido despedido. (participle form "sido"+ other participle)
-Ha estado corriendo. (participle form "estado" + continuous form)
Ohhhh! Estoy empezando a ver. So you use estado when YOU have been doing something, but you use sido when something has been done to you by someone/something else?

If that's the case, then this is finally beginning to dawn on me....
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