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Old 21st July 2009, 08:31 PM   #81
steph
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Hi Sharon,

I believe the link you were referring to is Loquo.com : )
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Old 24th July 2009, 06:48 AM   #82
SharonGist
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Default Thanks!

Thanks, Steph. I'll be in BCN 9/5/09, which is right around the corner. Sharon
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Old 17th August 2009, 09:15 PM   #83
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Default I am toying with the idea of moving to Spain for a year.

I am toying with the idea of moving to Spain for a year. I'm in my 30's though and not exactly someone that could do so without some security. I have a master's degree in counseling and speak Spanish. My spanish is not college level, so I don't know if it would be possible to get a job in my profession in Spain. My husband has a masters too in the same field, but doesn't speak any Spanish, in fact one of the main reason's I'm thinking about this is for him to learn Spanish. I am curious if it would be possible for us to get a jobs as social workers, which requires less spanish that therapy.

I found out recently that I can apply for dual citizenship USA/ Spain, but my husband is American. Would that make getting a job easier dispite the minor language barrier?

Anyone know about the social work/ psych field in Spain?

Thanks,
Diana
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Old 25th August 2009, 06:13 PM   #84
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Wow, I guess since I'm pretty young in comparison, I haven't had to chance to see how many people were interested in the same exact thing as me. I was doing all the research on the internet and was becoming rather discouraged by the results. I wasn't sure how I wanted to end up working in Spain, but by this forum, it looks like it would be easier to take a vacation there and "accidently" end up staying illegally? Not what I expected, but if that's the way to do it.
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Old 27th August 2009, 05:11 AM   #85
Elcocinero222
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Default Im a chef looking for work in spain next year

I am a chef in California i am looking for jobs in some of the best restaurants that spain has to offer. I would like to stay and study for 2-3yrs should i go and try and get a work visa from the consulate or work under the radar? all suggestions please

Last edited by Elcocinero222; 27th August 2009 at 05:14 AM.
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Old 24th September 2009, 08:40 AM   #86
bre91
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Smile I <3 Spain!

I want to move to Spain, however living in a big city like Madrid or Barcelona seems too expensive for me. Would I be able to find jobs teaching English in smaller cities? Also if I'm going to we working illegally, do I need any teaching certification? I am a native English speaker and speak Spanish at a college level.

Thanks 4 the help!
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Old 3rd November 2009, 10:34 PM   #87
holller.
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Default au pair

So I just moved to Madrid after traveling around Europe for a month to au pair. I have been here for 3 weeks and love the family and the kids, but now the question of visas and long term stay is coming up. I am curious about visas and what not.....I know I can apply for a student visa, but in all honesty I would rather not. I would like to come back and stay from mid Jan. to mid June and thought I would be ok without papers but recently read some scary stories about people getting deported and would love some advice!

Thanks!
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Old 17th November 2009, 09:20 PM   #88
keelayconcarene
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Default can someone comment further on the necessity of a return ticket.

for obvious reasons, don't want to purchase one, but don't want to run into the issues Ben mentioned. Gracias
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Old 26th November 2009, 12:20 AM   #89
picazoa
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Default Teaching English in Spanish schools

I am married to a Spanish citizen and we are considering living in Spain. I am an elementary school teacher in California and would like to teach at an elementary school in Madrid. What are my possibilities. I will have a work visa.
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Old 14th February 2010, 03:39 PM   #90
sweisbrot
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Default Spain 2010 I hope!

Hey guys, here's my situation:

I graduated with a BS in Psychology almost 2 years ago and moved to China immediately after to teach English. I also have a TESOL certificate. I'm still in China now with a contract that ends on June 30th. I'm flying back to the states to see my family on July 1st, and figured then would be the best time to move somewhere new. As a result, I'm considering Spain and had some questions.

You mentioned applying for a visa from your local Spanish consulate, however if I applied once I got back to the states, it'd be hard for me to get a job there before September because of the time you all said it takes. Could I apply from a Spanish consulate in China?

By the time I make the move from China to the US and then a few months later to Spain, I'll have about $5000 USD saved (hopefully). Is this enough to cover my initial expenses and be safe for some time?

Should I move into a hostel to save money, or find an apartment immediately? Is internet expensive (When I did a home stay in Austria, the family was paying like 20 euros a month for 400mb of upload and download streaming)?

I've read all 5 pages of the thread and realized that I should move to a smaller city like Sevilla or Costa Blanca to escape the problems of the larger cities. Opinions?

I'm used to having a contract with the school I work full-time for. It seems like Spain is a pretty shady place (which surprises me because I thought China was the worst country in that sense), so is there a way to get a job at a publicly owned government school (like a public primary school)?

Thank you for your time!!!
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Old 22nd February 2010, 05:52 AM   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post
[B]A: The happy-go-lucky no-work-Visa way:



Three: The 90 day rule.
In theory your entry visa is good for 90 days, but don’t worry, if you spend longer in Spain you will not be thrown into jail or banned from coming back when you try to leave. Just have an excuse handy (”My Spanish studies lasted longer than I had anticipated…”, for example…)


---------

Any further info on American citizens working in Spain with or without a visa, comments, suggestions, criticisms or refutations, are welcome below:
Hello,

I am an American planning to move to Spain this September. I'll be teaching English in Madrid and already have a position lined up with an academy. Now, from this post, I see that people just up and go to Spain w/o proper working papers or Visas, but I am not comfortable with this. I know that it's immensely difficult to get a Working permit, so I'm trying to go the Student Visa route.

Does anyone know any universities, schools, or institutes in which I could enroll in through which I could get a Visa???

I would prefer that they be as cheap as possible (I just graduated from college this past June and can't afford to spend my meager savings on school--again). Also, I majored in Spanish at college, so the quality of the university/school can be awful (I don't need to learn Spanish).

Please, any information you have is greatly appreciated. Thank you soooo very much!!!

-Azuka
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Old 22nd July 2010, 06:29 AM   #92
Lupine Chemist
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So I've managed to score a legitimate paid internship in madrid that's supposed to transition into full time work. (After all, I become uniquely qualified over a European for a work permit if it's the job I've been doing ) Since I'll start over there on a student visa, are taxes any different? For that matter, are taxes automatically withheld and what are the rates?

In the chance that someone else has gone to be an engineer, what is required for the Spanish engineering license and do you need one on a prácticas contract?
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Old 22nd July 2010, 09:37 AM   #93
Legazpi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lupine Chemist View Post
So I've managed to score a legitimate paid internship in madrid that's supposed to transition into full time work. (After all, I become uniquely qualified over a European for a work permit if it's the job I've been doing ) Since I'll start over there on a student visa, are taxes any different? For that matter, are taxes automatically withheld and what are the rates?

In the chance that someone else has gone to be an engineer, what is required for the Spanish engineering license and do you need one on a prácticas contract?
I don't know what the income tax rates are right now, but they do get taken off my payslip automatically. There is a tax return (declaración de la renta) but I think people only fill it out when they want to claim any tax rebates. I don't think it is obligatory.

I'm not aware of such a thing as a Spanish engineering license. I worked as an engineer in the UK and certainly never needed anything like that, and I haven't heard of it in Spain (although I now work in IT). Maybe you have heard the word "licenciatura" (which just means "degree") and mistakenly thought it meant "license"?
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Old 22nd July 2010, 02:05 PM   #94
PobrecitoHablador
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For "Spanish engineering license" you probably mean "colegios de ingenieros", there are different "colegios" for each engineer specialization. I lack knowlege and I have too many prejuices about them to give a good insight.
Or perhaps you mean "homologación del título", which is, more or less a paper by the Spanish govt. stating that your foreign studies are the same as the spanish stuies of "Ingeniería de.... <something>", I've heard that this may be quite difficult, but probably depends a lot in where do you studied and what exactly you studied.
If you have been already hired I suppose you need neither of them.

For the taxes, let me explain a little our system, at least the most common system for employees, if you are a self-employer thigns are different.
I don't know the American IRS, so can't just point the differences.
First of all, the Spanish income tax (IRPF) is progressive, so you pay a bigger percentage the bigger your income. The actual percentage to pay varies depending on many things, so giving a % based only on your income may be quite misleading.
1. When you start your job, your employer should give you a form (145, if my memory is OK), you may or may not return it filled in to your employer (you give out quite personal info if you do). Based on the info (or the lack of it) you give them and your salary your "retención" is calculated.
2. The "Retención" is the amount of money that your emplyer gives to the govt. for you (usually monthly, as most people here are paid monthly), as your tax paying. It is not exactly paying your taxes, it's more like guessing how much will you pay and getting it to be sure you "will" pay it.
3. Then, when the year is over, you do your "declaración de la renta", which is the "real" taxpaing. "Hacienda" (or "Agencia Tributaria") (the Spanish IRS) likes to over-estimate the "retenciones", so many people get a tax return, but not everybody, and if you get to pay its pretty obligatory.
Most people get a tax return and the govt. gets an "interest-free loan" so everyone is happy.
Doing the "declaración" has become quite easier if you work for a single employer, you ask "Hacienda" for a draft and if you agree with it you simply confirm it (you can do this over the internet).
4. You get your money back, or you pay dependig on your "declaración". Getting your money back has also become quite faster.

If you need to know how much you will pay, you may have a look at this progam provided by "Hacienda":
"Retenciones" calculation AEAT
but it requieres a NIF number, which you probably wont have.

You also pay more taxes mainly the "Seguridad Social", wich is also substracted from the salary.
here you may download a excel sheet to calculate both, SS payment and IRP "retención",

Also the IVA (Spanish for VAT) 18% for most goods, 7% form some others, 4% for "Fist Need" (mainly some food). IVA is added to the price of goods most stores display the price with it added, if not they should advertise it.
Some self-emplyers and small stores may ask you "¿Con factura o sin factura?", a polite and euphemistic way to say: "Should I charge you the VAT?" ("factura" is somewhat like an invoice but legally binding).

Hope my limited English was enough for such a complex subject. And hope it helps.

Last edited by PobrecitoHablador; 22nd July 2010 at 02:07 PM.
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Old 22nd July 2010, 02:52 PM   #95
Legazpi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PobrecitoHablador View Post
....
Your English is perfect. Please could you clarify if filling out the "declaración de la renta" is obligatory. I do it anyway since I claim back tax on my mortgage repayments but, given that it nearly always results in the government giving people some of their money back, I thought the government didn't encourage most people to fill it out.
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Old 27th July 2010, 01:50 PM   #96
PobrecitoHablador
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Fist of all, please understand that I'm not an expert in taxes just talking out of my experiences.
Doing the "Declaración" is obligatory for any "persona física" (You say physical person in English?), that is: any human being for us non-lawyers, that had their "residencia habitual" (usual residency?) in Spain during the last year.
There are excemptions, for example: you don't have to "declarar" if you get your income from the same payer (employer) and its less than 22.000€/year, but you don't get your tax refunds if you don't do it, so....
If you are obligated to "declarar" and you don't do it, I'm not sure what are the consecuences, but they vary dependeing on how much you should have declared, ranging from a fine (or perhaps just a warning "doit or be fined") to criminal ofenses.
But these later ones are quite rare, rich people knows how to pay few taxes legally.

Quote:
Your English is perfect
Thanks, but speaking it is way harder for me. Since I read tons of English, writing it is just a matter of a bit of practice.
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