Notes from Spain and Spanish Forum Learn REAL Spanish now!  

Go Back   Notes from Spain and Spanish Forum > Spain Forum > Moving to Spain and Living in Spain

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 19th July 2008, 08:59 AM   #21
Ben
Hero Forero
 
Ben's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,425
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Embug2000 View Post

1. I have only had one translation course and that was during my undergrad about 7 years ago. Will this hinder me? If so, what should I do to get a better foothold into the profession?
I hadn't done any translation courses before I started working as a translator, it didn't seem to matter at all. I was able to put a couple of things on my cv (fairly exaggerated at the time - I had done one translation for my father in law, so said I had worked as a translator for an architectural company...) and that was enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Embug2000 View Post
2. I have registered with proz.com at the suggestion of a forum member and after talking with my translator friend. But now I am at a loss of how to market myself since up to this point I have never done any translating. How does one market themselves for their first translation jobs? I don't even know what my specialty is!
See how other translators are marketing themselves on proz and copy their techniques! See what specialities other people put, see which ones you think you could do, and copy that! But offer as wide a range of services as possible. When I started I was being sent civil engineering translations - I had no idea about that field, but with the proz dictionaries etc I was able to keep doing the work. So be as open as possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Embug2000 View Post
3. Rates!? How do I know how much to charge?
Again, just see what other poeple are charging on the one hand. I think the first post in this thread talks about rates in Spain as well. Often it is simply a case of seeing what the agency is going to pay you - they set the rates. If it is a direct client, then you can charge more than you would get from an agency, who always take their cut before paying you. You can try and find what they charge clients direct by looking at a few translation agency websites.

I know these answers are a bit vague, but when you start out, don't be afraid to be a bit brash, to copy what others are doing, to exaggerate your experience (Spanish companies rarely do any background checks). You could try signing up for online agency http://fluentwork.com/ - there is a link on there saying they are looking for translators.

Good luck! With perserverance, and a willingness to try different things too, like teaching, you will surely do well here.
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19th July 2008, 01:25 PM   #22
Embug2000
Senorita Bug
 
Embug2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 27
Default Many Thanks!

Thanks Ben! It seems daunting at first and I guess I am a bit scared to screw something up the first time around with translating, but I am not one to give up so I guess there is no time like the present!
Embug2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th August 2008, 10:59 PM   #23
chicoinglés
Chuchito
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Barcelona, España
Posts: 9
Default Translation work in Barcelona!

Hi Ben,

I am 23, and have just finished my BA (Hons) degree in Spanish and Italian, and am due to be going to Barcelona on the 12th September, to do my MA in Translation Studies at the Universitat Pompeu i Fabra. My plan after finishing this is to stay on in Barna and hopefully live with my Spanish fiancée. I would love to be a translator, and maybe even an interpreter one day, and therefore, while I am studying for the MA, I would like (and need) to get a job to finance it. It would be fantastic if I could work in the translation field, i.e. have some practical experience while I'm studying, and hopefully, this would then lead to a career as a translator.

With regard to my translating experience, I am similar to one of the other posters on here, in that I have only done some basic translation study in my final year at university, which although being a useful insight to the field, doesn't really count as 'work experience'. I have been looking (very briefly at this stage, I might add) at various translation agencies in Spain, and more in particularly, in Barcelona to assist with my job search. I have also registered on http://www.proz.com as a 'Student', but I'm not sure where to go from here. Perhaps you could give me some pointers in the right direction?

Another thing, I don't know how I could put 'the odd translation' I've done for whoever on my CV, because I haven't had any experience of this kind. (plus I'm not very imaginative when it comes down to it)

Me serviría de mucha ayuda cualquier consejo que me podrías dar,

Un abrazo,

Jordan
chicoinglés is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th September 2008, 04:14 AM   #24
WanderingBull
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

When I was living nomadically in South America I worked as a translator on the internets for some Spanish translation companies. I think like some folks said, it would be possible to make alright money after building oneself up for up to a year in Spain on the internets. But what if one were to work in-house for a translation company? That might be more fun because I would get to meet some real Spaniards in the flesh instead of sitting home in a dark apartment room totally isolated from society. I mean I might as well be in friggin Cleveland, OH! Anyways, enough with the ranting. I looked on loquo.com and it appears the going rate is 21,000€-24,000€ bruto. Does this mean before taxes or after taxes? And... is it possible to live decently with 21,000€/year in Madrid? That translates to oh about $30,000 and in these here United States you can't live too well on that... thanks for any help!@
  Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2008, 10:39 AM   #25
reneedamstra
Forero
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edith View Post
Thanks Ben for posting... I'm still thinking about embarking on that four-year Spanish translator's course next year! Unfortunately, I can't show you the curriculum details because they are all in Dutch, otherwise I would like you to see it. First of all, they teach you Spanish, and lots of it. Other subjects include computer skills (*heh*), translation skills, intercultural communication, history and culture of the Spanish-speaking world, etc.
Edith, where do they teach that? I'd like to translate to Dutch as well. (spreek Nederlands uiteraard maar zo kunnen andere mensen het ook nog lezen).
reneedamstra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2008, 10:46 AM   #26
reneedamstra
Forero
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post
Two. E-mail a covering letter with a brief outline of your experience to a long list of translation agencies, offering to send them a full CV. Lists of agencies can be found via obvious google searches, and the Spanish yellow pages
Do you mean just putting agencies on the list you found on google or the spanish yellow pages aka lying about your experience? :P
reneedamstra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2008, 11:13 AM   #27
Ben
Hero Forero
 
Ben's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,425
Default

I would never advocate lying about anything
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2008, 12:31 PM   #28
reneedamstra
Forero
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post
I would never advocate lying about anything
Sorry I read your post wrong.
Maybe it's because I'm having the flu :P should go into bed right now!
reneedamstra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2008, 09:06 PM   #29
Legazpi
Mega Forero
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Madrid (Arganzuela)
Posts: 834
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingBull View Post
...I looked on loquo.com and it appears the going rate is 21,000€-24,000€ bruto. Does this mean before taxes or after taxes? And... is it possible to live decently with 21,000€/year in Madrid? That translates to oh about $30,000 and in these here United States you can't live too well on that... thanks for any help!@
If they put "bruto" then it means before taxes (i.e. "gross"). You can live ok off €21,000/year. I guess it translates to taking home about €1350/month which should cover sharing a decent flat (about €400/month) and still leave enough to go out a fair bit (provided you don't run a car)
Legazpi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th November 2008, 03:38 PM   #30
iris83
Novato
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1
Default relecture de ma lettre de motivation

bonjour,
je dois partir en Espagne faire mon Service Volonatire Européen, j'ai donc du rédiger ma lettre de motivation et je souhaiterais que quelqu'un la relise afin de me dire si c'est compréhensible!
merci de me faire signe car je ne peux pas la mettre dans le message!
iris83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th April 2009, 07:46 PM   #31
Hagrid
Forero Senior
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: at the mo Pensylvania
Posts: 61
Default

I´m fairly new to these boards and finding out a lot of useful info from them. Just want to say thanks for all the useful posts! I am currently doing an online translation course(WLS Certificate course-however not sure if it will be recognised in Spain seeing as it´s not a Spanish qualification) as it´s something I´m interested in doing and would like a career change. I´ve been working as a TEFL teacher for the past 6 yrs and have had enough of working in academies, being "ripped off" and just teaching in general. However, sounds like translation work is very competitive and I find the course tough going and boring at times. At least, now I know some ways of how to go about finding work/promoting myself when I finish my course and will hopefully find work when I come back to Spain!
Hagrid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th April 2009, 06:03 AM   #32
Ben
Hero Forero
 
Ben's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,425
Default

Good luck with the course, and the return to Spain!
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th May 2009, 12:37 PM   #33
ang
Forero
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Lancs, UK
Posts: 19
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post
Finally, a lot of translation work is very boring (conracts, technical and engineering documents). But don't let that put you off - it's just something to bear in mind!
hey ben, i'm currently working as an engineer in the uk and have pretty good all round communication skills (sadly a rare thing for engineers!) and a basic grasp of spanish.

while i'm nowhere near ready yet (just completed an intermediate course), i'm thinking of the next 5-10 years maybe doing something with my spanish, possibly moving over there. would i be at an advantage for translating with my technical skills background? or would i be better to stick to the straight technical jobs?
ang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th May 2009, 03:04 PM   #34
Legazpi
Mega Forero
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Madrid (Arganzuela)
Posts: 834
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ang View Post
hey ben, i'm currently working as an engineer in the uk and have pretty good all round communication skills (sadly a rare thing for engineers!) and a basic grasp of spanish.

while i'm nowhere near ready yet (just completed an intermediate course), i'm thinking of the next 5-10 years maybe doing something with my spanish, possibly moving over there. would i be at an advantage for translating with my technical skills background? or would i be better to stick to the straight technical jobs?
I work in IT in Madrid and occasionally have translations thrown my way, including some engineering translations (my first degree was in Mechanical Engineering). I think there is quite a bit of work available for translating technical documents and there are some courses that help you to specialise in it:

http://www.iol.org.uk/qualifications/exams_diptrans.asp

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/humanitie...cintranslation

Of course you can find a lot of translation work online, so you don't need to come to Spain before giving it a go. You could even try to build up a client base and seeing whether its a viable option while your still in the UK. You'll also get a chance to see for yourself whether you like the work or not.

Personally I prefer to do straight technical jobs in Spain since they give me the chance to work in a Spanish office, meet Spanish people, improve my Spanish, and generally integrate into Spanish society. I also prefer the social contact you get from working in an office to the rather isolated world of the freelance translator.
Legazpi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th August 2009, 10:51 PM   #35
Oksie
Forero
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 9
Default

Hi Ben,

Sorry to ask this question here (Teaching English forum has been closed).

I am Russian and have been living in the UK for 3 years, have been studying English for 14 years, have done a degree in teaching English in Russia and have 2 years of teaching experience (also in Russia) and I speak Spanish to an advanced ( I hope !) level. I am thinking of doing CELTA, here in the UK and then trying to find a teaching job in Madrid (maybe even teaching both English and Russian!).
I wonder if Spanish employers will be willing to issue a work permit (as I am not an EU-national and not a native speaker), especially taking into consideration the state of the Spanish economy.

Also, is it worth having all relevant diplomas/certificates from Russia translated into Spanish and notorised?

Gracias de antemano,

Oksana
Oksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th September 2009, 05:47 PM   #36
oreocrisps
Novato
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1
Default any company suggestions?

hey,

i was wondering if you would be able to suggest some good translation service companies. i have been looking around but i am not too sure. my friend referred me to a company but i would like some more feedback. please let me know. thank you!

Last edited by eldeano; 11th September 2009 at 05:53 PM. Reason: Link removed - see forum rules.
oreocrisps is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks
Learn REAL Spanish now!

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.