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Old 22nd March 2008, 08:29 PM   #41
eldeano
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Hola Katya. Bienvenida al foro.
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Old 11th April 2008, 06:28 PM   #42
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Default Americans without papers

Hey everyone,

I lived in Spain off and on for nearly six years without having any visas or work permits, and I know plenty of other non-EU folks in the same boat. Finding work as an English teacher is not a problem -- even the academies who claim in their ads that they only hire EU passport holders will almost always hire non-EUers as well (it's a bit of a tax break for them anyways...) Unfortunately it's a lot harder to get any other sort of job (like bartending, tour guide, etc.) if you're not legal because you're a lot more "exposed"... With teaching English, the academy sends you off to the clients' homes or offices, so it's more difficult for authorities to track you down.

Hope this helps, and good luck to all the Americans who want to join us in Spain!

kronos

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Old 21st May 2008, 04:31 AM   #43
ErnieLG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronos View Post
Hey everyone,

I lived in Spain off and on for nearly six years without having any visas or work permits, and I know plenty of other non-EU folks in the same boat. Finding work as an English teacher is not a problem -- even the academies who claim in their ads that they only hire EU passport holders will almost always hire non-EUers as well (it's a bit of a tax break for them anyways...) Unfortunately it's a lot harder to get any other sort of job (like bartending, tour guide, etc.) if you're not legal because you're a lot more "exposed"... With teaching English, the academy sends you off to the clients' homes or offices, so it's more difficult for authorities to track you down.

Hope this helps, and good luck to all the Americans who want to join us in Spain!

kronos

www.allthingsspain.net
http://eslhell-thepaininspain.blogspot.com/
Does anyone know any academies or other businesses that have no problem hiring sin papeles? Is it safe to assume that most will hire you?
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Old 7th June 2008, 02:22 PM   #44
MarsQ
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Hi all,
I'm an American citizen and I've been living in Madrid for almost 8 months now. I've been studying Spanish and in the last 4 months, I've started teaching English as a part-time job. However, just like many others, I would love to find a full-time/ professional job in an office. I have few friends that I met from school that are able to find jobs in offices easily because they are Europeans. But as I've heard, it is really difficult to get hired in a professional job since I am not an EU citizen. I've been feeling depressed and desperated. So, I just want to ask if anyone out there has the experience of finding an office job? Any Americans out there working in professional jobs in Spain? How do I find those jobs? And is there a job-search website(s) that posts English jobs?

Your information is greatly appreciated!
Thanks very much!
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Old 7th June 2008, 03:20 PM   #45
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Hi MarsQ

The most popular site is www.infojobs.net (search for the word "english" and you should get several pages of results). Getting the work permit is another matter - I believe there may be a few tricks, but apparently it's very difficult (we get the same problem if trying to find work in the USA).

Do you have any specific skills that might help you find a job?
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Old 7th June 2008, 03:55 PM   #46
MarsQ
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Hi Legazpi,
Thanks very much for your prompt reply and information. I will try my luck on the website info you've given me. Well, I think it's going to be tough for me because I have my academic degrees in Urban Planning and Environmental Science- both are specialized and small sectors which makes it pretty hard to find a job, as comparing to "Business Administration". I know it will be tough to find a job in those sectors in most countries. And in the states, I worked in an environmental nonprofit organization doing public education and accounting. I have few years of Administrative and research experience, which I hope it would qualify me in an office job. And I am a Chinese-American, so, I am bilingual (fluent in Chinese and English). But I still need to improve my Spanish. I need to look for American companies, I hope it would be easier with them to hire Americans. With the down-hill trend of the economy, I feel that the possibility to find a job here is getting more and more slim.
Thanks so much for your information.
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Old 7th June 2008, 04:54 PM   #47
Legazpi
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Hi MarsQ

You might have luck targeting large multinationals who outsource to China and require your language skills. I searched for "chinese" on infojobs and got this vacancy that only requires a student visa:

http://madrid.oferta.infojobs.net/re...85538439226203

You really need to fire off applications to any job for which you feel suitable, even if you feel under qualified. There are very few people in Madrid who are bilingual in Chinese and English, if you can get your Spanish skills up to a reasonable level you might find yourself in quite a powerful position for certain jobs.

Good luck
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Old 7th June 2008, 05:23 PM   #48
MarsQ
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Legazpi, thank you so much again for your wonderful help. Your information certainly gave my energy a boost. I will give that job a try and just send my CV to other jobs that I may be qualified for. And indeed, I really need to sharpen up my Spanish skills.
Your help is very much appreciated!
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Old 23rd September 2008, 01:06 AM   #49
jenny102
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Hi

My situation is a little different. My husband ( a spaniard) has been living in the US for the past year on a very restrictive dependant visa. This visa basically gives you no rights with respect to any work or education . He has even been turned away from volunteering because he doesn't have a SSN! Uncle Sam however, finds no problem in asking him to pay taxes (to breathe the american air, I suppose!). He is quite depressed about his usefulness.My career (I am 27) is the only thing keeping us here.
Ironically, he was an self-employed english teacher in spain for over 10 years and paid taxes four a times a year!

I am not sure if working illegally anywhere is ever the right thing to do.


Just my two cents.
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Old 28th September 2008, 11:06 PM   #50
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Hi acmench,

I saw that you lived in Madrid for 2 years and worked teaching English. I was wondering if during that time you applied for a residence permit. Did you pay taxes? Or did you just stay under the radar? If the later were you able to rent an apartment and open a bank account with no problem? Thanks so much for all the advice. I'm new on the forum and have already received so much good info.
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Old 29th September 2008, 04:12 AM   #51
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What's that thing they have in the U.S.? Oh yes, the fifth amendment
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Old 29th September 2008, 08:50 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivett View Post
Hi acmench,

I saw that you lived in Madrid for 2 years and worked teaching English. I was wondering if during that time you applied for a residence permit. Did you pay taxes? Or did you just stay under the radar? If the later were you able to rent an apartment and open a bank account with no problem? Thanks so much for all the advice. I'm new on the forum and have already received so much good info.
Hi, Ivett,

During my two years teaching English I never applied for my residency as I didn't really think there was much of a point. No taxes. All under the radar more or less. I rented an apartment and had a bank account (Banco Popular) for years. I necer had any problems in that regard. Let me know if you have any other questions. Suerte!!
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Old 16th November 2008, 08:50 PM   #53
Skipper
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Hola a todos.

As a Spaniard native, I must say you that not everything in Spain is Madrid or Barcelona, and not every work here for english speakers goes through a Language School.

I live at Alicante, in the Mediteranean seashore. This is a full touristic area with a very pleseant temperature the whole year, and as touristic area is full of foreigners that have decided so coming here for a few days... or for not so few years. They come from all around Europe, from UK to Norway, Sweden, Germany... And beeing the english the more extended international language, as you can imagine there are a lot of english speakers working options, from translators to doctors, from barman to lawyers, from car rental clerks to airport workers... and sure... guides and english teachers

Now, there is a very big crisis all around the world, and Spain is not an exception, but if I had to look for a job in Spain now, I would try to find it via internet and I think that will be easier to you to find a future in Spain through this way on webs like www.infojobs.net or www.infoempleo.com .. These are the more usuals, but you can type on your google or similar "Buscar Trabajo España" and you will find a lot of options.

I hope to have been helpful for you. Don't hesitate to PM me for any question.

Un saludo.

Last edited by greytop; 17th November 2008 at 08:48 AM. Reason: mail link removed - use the private messaging, it's safer
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Old 17th November 2008, 10:10 PM   #54
Skipper
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Sorry for the mistake, greytop, and thanks for the edition. I just wanted to help.

Well, reading a local newspaper, today I've seen the a title as follows:

CASI 800 UNIVERSITARIOS ELIGEN CLASES EN INGLÉS.

And in a smaller letter you can read:

LA FALTA DE PROFESORES QUE DOMINEN EL IDIOMA, LA PRINCIPAL DIFICULTAD PARA IMPLANTAR EL TRILINGÜISMO

As you can see, Alicante University has no enough english speaking teachers...

Regards.
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Old 18th November 2008, 04:57 AM   #55
Katie L
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Interesting discussion going on here. I am also curious on how one goes about finding a "real" job in Spain as an American.

I am about to finish up student teaching and will be a certified Spanish and journalism teacher (high school) here in the U.S. Does this carry any weight in terms of finding a teaching job in Spain? Would it be possible to get hired as a high school (instituto?) English teacher at a public or private school?

And lets say it is possible for me to locate some school that thinks I'd be a fabulous teacher. What are the legal requirements for secondary school teachers in Spain? Would I have to have an English or TESOL degree? Are there exams, etc, that teachers must take for certification? Would it be easier to work in a private secondary school?

It might be a totally unrealistic idea, but I'd be qualified in theory...as a language teacher and native English speaker.
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Old 9th February 2009, 08:08 PM   #56
reesesc
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I'm trying to get a feel for how I should be going about this 'grey area' business. I'm taking CELTA in September at Hyland Language Centre and hope to stay in Madrid working as an English teacher. My question is that even though the tourist visa is for three months and I could make up an excuse as to why I stayed longer than that, how do I get back in if I leave? I'm just wondering if I'll be able to return to the states to visit (or leave the Schengen states at all). The rule says you can only live for 3 months out of every 6 months in Spain, so would they question me after seeing my passport on my way back to Madrid? I'd love to get a work visa but I don't know if that would ever happen/how long it takes to become autonomo....any thoughts?
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Old 12th March 2009, 06:47 PM   #57
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What happens if you have a roundtrip flight but its not for seven months out? i plan on staying in Spain most of the time but traveling outside also and i dont want to be forced to buy a flight bc my return ticket is out of the 90 days? also I got my tefl certificate and plan on teaching English but im having a hard time finding any job openings?
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Old 13th March 2009, 05:43 AM   #58
alicia21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post
A: The happy-go-lucky no-work-Visa way:

Here are a few tips I picked up from a recent chat with an American girl who has been working out here for over two years with no EU citizenship and no problems whatsoever. (Of course these rules apply to all non-EU citizens.) Please don't hold me responsible if any of the following changes with time! (With your help we can keep this info up-to-date).

One: You can work!
If you turn up in Spain without a work visa, you will find work, mostly English teaching, bar work and maybe tour guiding. Employers in these fields are prepared to pay non-EU nationals - in cash. But don’t worry, you can open a bank account in Spain with no trouble at all.

Bigger cities will have more work opportunities, so if in doubt start with Barcelona or Madrid.

Two: The return ticket.
Arriving at a Spanish airport from the US with no return ticket is likely to be an expensive mistake. You will probably be forced to buy one there and then, in the airport, at a hugely increased price. You may be able to get a refund afterwards though, so it might not be the end of the world.

Three: The 90 day rule.
In theory your entry visa is good for 90 days, but don’t worry, if you spend longer in Spain you will not be thrown into jail or banned from coming back when you try to leave. Just have an excuse handy (”My Spanish studies lasted longer than I had anticipated…”, for example…)

Four: Spending.
Don’t turn up with travelers cheques, they are a pain to convert into cash. Just your regular cashpoint card is fine. Match the symbols on the back with those on Spanish cashpoints if you get confused! (Is ‘cashpoint’ only British English? ATM’s then…) And be prepared to spend. The dollar is better than it was but many a traveler arrives in Spain expecting the cheap country it once was. Times have changed…

---------

Any further info on American citizens working in Spain with or without a visa, comments, suggestions, criticisms or refutations, are welcome below:
great article. I will bookmark this
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Old 31st March 2009, 04:06 PM   #59
borideponce
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my wife just left to Ibiza..she is American and is looking for work..does she need to contact an embassy or what should she do?
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Old 21st April 2009, 05:40 AM   #60
itwasthewind
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Default Short (Under 90 day) trip in Barcelona

Hello All -

I wanted to visit Barcelona for just a few weeks (about 12), so under the legal limit for time I can spend there. While I am there though, I would like to teach either English, or more specifically GMAT if possible (I have a very high score, and will be attending a top school in 2010). Would it be possible for me to find that sort of work either through an academy or privately?

If I want to try to secure students before I arrive, what online resource would one recommend I use?
Also, while I am an American citizen, I am also of Indian decent ... would that have any bearing on people being less willing to hire me? I don't know whether there are any preconceptions folks would have about my English teaching capabilities?

Any advice would be really appreciated. Thanks everyone!
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