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Old 18th October 2010, 05:25 PM   #21
Tumbit
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We get something similar in England. Sometimes people who come from a region where the "h" is dropped try to be posh and end up adding an "h" to the beginning of a word that doesn't start with that letter.
LOL, I agree with you Stephen - Coming from a Village between 'uddersfield and 'alifax in Yorkshire, my spoken alphabet only contains 25 letters. When I first took Spanish lessons I was overly concious of my strong Yorkshire accent and probably tried to over-compensate for my missing 'H's' - only to be told that I shouldn't be pronouncing them.
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Old 18th October 2010, 11:54 PM   #22
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Perhaps, sonically, the grass is greener on the other side, but I find the castillian spanish in Spain to sound more elegant and precise, if not beautiful than the spanish variations I commonly hear in the US. I understand the spanish in the Americas is inherited from the Andalusians who comprised most of the explorers to the Americas. When I hear a spaniard speak, other than my father, my ears perk up.
The great majority of the explorers of the New World was not Andalusian, they were from Extremadura
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Old 18th October 2010, 11:58 PM   #23
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I do not think that the Andalusian accent is looked down upon in the rest of Spain, and it is definitely not considered vulgar. It is, however, the "official" accent that many people fake when they try to sound funny, as Andalusians are often stereotyped as a jocund and merry folk.

Like in the rest of the languages, regional dialects in Spanish present a lot of varieties. Any person with a thick rural accent, for instance, no matter what his regional dialect is, may indeed be looked down by more educated people.

As for this spokesperson of the Popular Party considering that Trinidad Jiménez has no chances to become the Mayor of Madrid because of her accent, it is absolutely nonsense. Not many years ago, Álvarez del Manzano, the very candidate of the PP, was chosen as mayor of Madrid for several consecutive terms despite being from Seville. He still speaks with an Andalusian accent, albeit not very strong. In any case, his parlance is not that of your regular Madrileño.
It is that the Andalusian accent is not the same accent in all Andalusia. The inhabitants of Jaen, Almeria and north of Huelva have a more Castilianized accent that nothing has in relation with the well-known Andalusian accent
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Old 19th October 2010, 03:03 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Tumbit View Post
LOL, I agree with you Stephen - Coming from a Village between 'uddersfield and 'alifax in Yorkshire, my spoken alphabet only contains 25 letters. When I first took Spanish lessons I was overly concious of my strong Yorkshire accent and probably tried to over-compensate for my missing 'H's' - only to be told that I shouldn't be pronouncing them.
Ya lucked out, then!
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Old 19th October 2010, 03:07 AM   #25
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The great majority of the explorers of the New World was not Andalusian, they were from Extremadura
Except that a group of Andalusian migrants settled in central and south america in the 17th century. Also there were a number of Andalusian explorers. Given the proximity of Extremadura to Andalucia, is it beyond the realm of possibility that the two may share some speaking patterns?
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Old 19th October 2010, 02:40 PM   #26
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Except that a group of Andalusian migrants settled in central and south america in the 17th century. Also there were a number of Andalusian explorers. Given the proximity of Extremadura to Andalucia, is it beyond the realm of possibility that the two may share some speaking patterns?
Good luck with trying to convince an Andalusian or Extremaduran of that ...
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Old 19th October 2010, 07:44 PM   #27
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Good luck with trying to convince an Andalusian or Extremaduran of that ...
Oh, I know. There are a lot of references to Andalusians influencing latin american spanish and scant Extremaduran references.
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Old 20th October 2010, 12:18 PM   #28
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The Argentinian word for a 'Spaniard' is, apparently, 'un gallego'.
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Old 21st October 2010, 11:13 AM   #29
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The Argentinian word for a 'Spaniard' is, apparently, 'un gallego'.
The cubans do the same, but informally.
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Old 21st October 2010, 10:41 PM   #30
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Take the example of the dialogue in Mariano Azuela's excellent novel of the Mexican revolution, Los de Abajo. Compare it with the syntax and transcription of pronunciation in El Miajón de los Castúos by Luis Chamizo, an Extremaduran poet of the same period. The similarities are striking.

Medellín was a pueblo in Extremadura long before being a city in the Americas, as were Alburquerque, Trujillo, Mérida, etc, etc.
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Old 22nd October 2010, 05:06 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tumbit View Post
Coming from a Village between 'uddersfield and 'alifax in Yorkshire, my spoken alphabet only contains 25 letters. When I first took Spanish lessons I was overly concious of my strong Yorkshire accent and probably tried to over-compensate for my missing 'H's' - only to be told that I shouldn't be pronouncing them.
Although I generally remember not to pronounce the initial 'h' in Spanish, for some reason I tend to pronounce it in the verb 'hablar', much to the amusement of a Moroccan friend with whom I sometimes speak Spanish - 'habla' in Moroccan Arabic means 'crazy woman' !

(Lo siento por going off topic)
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