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Old 5th September 2010, 01:12 PM   #1
Andy.G.
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Default pero , es tu casa coņo

I have just spent best part of a month is spain, and during that time it seemed that everybody in Spain had decided to have their holidays on the coast. In the street where I was staying , all the Spanish came out the house during the evening carry chairs and would sit in the middle of the street charlando . What surprised me was how many times the word coņo was used amongst themselves and whilethere were children running around playing and listening to what is being said.
People of all ages where saying it( a lady of 80 years said to me during a conversation " Andy esa es tu casa coņo,".
My question is this .. is coņo as rude as I was led to believe when I was learning spanish? . or am I hanging out with the wrong crowd.

Espera que no te ofenda eso,
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Old 5th September 2010, 03:51 PM   #2
gary
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It doesnt equate to the bombshell that would drop in England if you use the translation in polite company, I have frequently heard it used by women to children and recently by a little old lady to her dog... Personally I avoid it as you never know when the context is right and wrong when youre not a native speaker...
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Old 5th September 2010, 04:50 PM   #3
Stephen
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Was your accommodation that bad Andy?
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Old 5th September 2010, 05:36 PM   #4
Legazpi
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No it's no where near as rude - otherwise people wouldn't be using it the whole time.
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Old 5th September 2010, 06:38 PM   #5
Matthew Stewart
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First of all, swear words are incredibly dangerous if you don't know how to use them. One slight change can often invert their meaning, as in...

de p*** madre...****ing brilliant
tu p*** madre...**** you

Secondly, in general (although there are exceptions), religious connotations are more taboo than sexual references in Spanish, whereas the reverse is true in English.

So, coņo...

Coņo is often used as an exclamation to provide emphasis, as in...

ĄDamelo ya, coņo!

It's never used as a personal insult. Coņazo, meanwhile has a different meaning. I remember the first time I taught in Spain. I found myself in the staffroom one day, sitting next to the Head of History, a middle-aged lady. She was marking a pile of exams till she looked up and exclaimed...

ĄQué coņazo!...What a pain!

Suffice to say, I soon realised the socialcultural mistakes that arise from direct translations of swear words!
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Old 6th September 2010, 02:13 PM   #6
Andy.G.
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Gracias a todos por sus consejos, I think I will take your advice and avoid it , at least until I have a better grasp of the language and how and when to use certain frases.

@ hahha no , the acommodation was alright , but the problem was that I had to rent somebody elses property because I had already rented mine out to someone and the lady couldnt understand why I would not kick them out and use my own,
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Old 9th September 2010, 09:25 AM   #7
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Quote:
coņo.

(Del lat. cŭnnus).

1. m. malson. Parte externa del aparato genital de la hembra.

2. m. despect. Chile. espaņol (‖ natural de Espaņa).

3. m. vulg. Ven. tipo (‖ individuo).

4. adj. Chile y Ec. tacaņo (‖ miserable).

coņo.

1. interj. U. para expresar diversos estados de ánimo, especialmente extraņeza o enfado.
http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltGUIB...LEMA=co%C3%B1o

American regionalisms apart, this definition shows some interesting things about the Spanish c-word:
-Used as an interjection its not even considered vulgarĄ
-The only definition "malsonante" is the first one, the female genitalia.

So, if used as an interjection (in Spain) "Ącoņo!" is only a mild, somewhat vulgar "badword". But if used to refer to the female genitalia it is very rude, possibly less than in English, but still it is very rude and vulgar and possibly offensive. If used as a femenine substitute to the masculine "cojones", it may not be considered as offensive but sitll express a high level of rudeness and low culture.

By the way, the Spanish f-word "joder" works in a similar way.

I wonder why chileans call us spaniards "coņos"

Spaniards are quite "malhablados", this is possible related to the fact that Spanish "badwords" are not as "bad" (in general) as English ones, but I don't know if this is a reason or a consequence.
Arturo Peréz-Reverte, a famous Spanish writer (and a member of RAE), writes (wrote?) a weekly article not afraid of using rude words (and very provocative), for example, a brilliant explanation of the word "cojones":
http://carmenlobo.blogcindario.com/2...e-cojones.html
Be advised that the style may be difficult to Spanish learners, and he probably manages to upset any English speaker out there (yet another bit of his provocative style).
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Old 9th September 2010, 12:21 PM   #8
parubin
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This is a tricky one, but I agree entirely with 'Pobrecito Hablador'.

In Spain the word 'coņo' may refer to two totally different concepts :

One would be the female genitalia, if you use 'coņo' in this sense it would be an extremely rude and gross thing to say that would leave your company flabbergasted in a really bad way.

Obviously people donīt often engage themselves in open conversations about vulva so basically all of the times this word is heard has a totally different and very mild meaning. It is a common interjection, meaning suprise or disdain, it could be the equivalent to the English 'damn', or when you say 'ĄQué coņo!', it would be something like 'What the hell!'.

There is a (bad) joke explaining this two different meanings : "un padre pasea con su hijo por una playa nudista, se cruzan con tres chichas y sorprende a su hijo mirando extasiado : -ŋSe puede saber qué coņo miras? -Yo el del medio, ŋy tú?."
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Old 9th September 2010, 04:44 PM   #9
yunouguaramin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parubin View Post
There is a (bad) joke explaining this two different meanings : "un padre pasea con su hijo por una playa nudista, se cruzan con tres chichas y sorprende a su hijo mirando extasiado : -ŋSe puede saber qué coņo miras? -Yo el del medio, ŋy tú?."
bad joke?

I find it amusing que te cagas

Last edited by yunouguaramin; 9th September 2010 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 13th September 2010, 06:31 PM   #10
lenox
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As far as I've seen, the Spanish don't use asterisks or other signs when swearing in print - unlike the English 'f**c' and the American '#$%!'.
I was surprised to note than the Brazilians also use asterisks to cover their words.
Silly, I think: Ącoņo!
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