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Old 28th September 2008, 05:31 PM   #141
El Confuso
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Originally Posted by tad View Post
I am not the first to make this mistake apparently. You can buy this fine work for $275.
If you look closely at the web page which you referenced, you will find other errors. The title of the series of works is given as "Virgens de la Natura," which in Spanish should be "Vírgenes de la Naturaleza." For a moment I actually wondered if some other language was being used. I don't know much Italian and I did find that "natura" is Italian for "nature," but other words are not consistent with that theory. The title of the specific work on the referenced page is "Virgen del Parajos," which should be "Virgen de los Pajaros." If you use the "next" button to view the next work in the series, you'll see the title as "Virgen del Desirto," which should be "Virgen del Desierto." You'd think that an artist who tries to add an "artsy" touch to his work by using a foreign language should be more careful that his usage is correct (especially for his asking price).
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Old 2nd October 2008, 11:59 PM   #142
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Originally Posted by Anjelo View Post
Sea lo que sea= Whatever it is/ Whatever it may be

Por ejemplo:

Sea lo que sea, creo que estará bien.
Whatever it may be, I believe it will be good.
If someone wanted a another translation of this phrase in English, it would be:
Be as it may....
This may be more old English than new, but it is still used.

Last edited by ValenciaSon; 3rd October 2008 at 10:57 AM. Reason: spelling correction
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Old 3rd October 2008, 12:27 AM   #143
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Originally Posted by Anjelo View Post
just heard these two expressions.

Ha de ser
Ha de decir

Anybody know what they mean?
ha de + infintive does connote obligation and can be understood as "should'' along with ''must''. Por ejemplo, ''ha de ser'' puede ser traducido ''is to be'' o en plural ''han de ser'' como ''are to be''. I've seen it used more in the third person then in the 2nd person. Such as.

e.g.
Los cristianos han de ser la luz del mundo ...haciendo buenas obras...ayudando otras personas, sus prójimos, etc ...

In English
Christians are to be [or more modern should be] the light of the world ... doing good works, helping other people, their neighbors, etc...

un soldado ha de ser o debe ser un buen ejemplo de disciplina y coraje...

English
a soldier is to be / should be a good exmple of discipline y courage

In this case, one could also say has to be which is frequently used and the most literal translation, I suppose, of ha de ser

Last edited by DavidTN; 3rd October 2008 at 12:30 AM.
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Old 3rd October 2008, 08:07 AM   #144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidTN View Post
If someone wanted a another translation of this frase in English, it would be:
Be as it may....
This may be more old English than new, but it is still used.
Should that be "be that as it may..."
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Old 3rd October 2008, 11:44 PM   #145
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I am pretty sure the common english expression is: "Be as it may'' but your inquiry has caused me to rethink the situation. You may be correct and seeing how the way things go around here, both expressions are probably valid. However, I am sure that a google search will clear up the confusion, and if someone else does not get to it first, I will search for it when I have time. Bueno, voy a usar esta oportunidad para practicar la expresión. Porque sea lo que sea, encontraremos la respuesta.
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Old 5th October 2008, 10:45 PM   #146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidTN View Post
I am pretty sure the common english expression is: "Be as it may''
Not where I come from.

Quote:
However, I am sure that a google search will clear up the confusion, and if someone else does not get to it first, I will search for it when I have time.
The results are in:

1,390,000 for "be as it may"
3,820,000 for "be that as it may"

Not that you should use popularity of hits via Google as a definitive guide to grammar, but there you go anyway...
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Old 7th October 2008, 08:43 PM   #147
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So in that case, Haber de... is just like Deber que... ?
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Old 8th October 2008, 07:52 AM   #148
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anjelo View Post
So in that case, Haber de... is just like Deber que... ?
The way I was taught is that it is a matter of degree

Necesaria o impuesto : tener que
Tengo que estudiar para el examen (You MUST study...)
Menor, aspecto moral o consejo : deber
Debo estudiar para el examen (You should study ....) NB use this form as an answer to a request using poder.
¿Podemos fumar aquí? No, no debéis fumar aqui.
More impersonal form : hay que
Hay que estudiar para el examen (One should study...)

Hope that helps!

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Old 12th February 2009, 11:21 PM   #149
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This thread is amazing, thank you!!
I've just copied everything here into my vocab book
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Old 22nd February 2009, 08:44 AM   #150
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A while back someone asked for a translation of:

"Eramos poco, y parió la abuela."

That's the version I'm most familiar with, but I have also seen:

Eramos poco, y parió la burra.
Eramos poco, y parió la perra.

No one gave a translation. From the way it's used, it seems that "eramos poco" is used sarcastically, so the phrase means something along the lines of "that's the last thing we needed [to happen]."

Does anyone know if that's right?

As to "Como al gato que se comió el canario," I believe that "al" is a contraction of a el. "Como a" is the phrase used for comparing. So it could be written as "Como a el gato ...," but the contraction is used.

compare for example:

Le falta una pata al gato.
Le falta una pata el gato,

The second sentence makes no sense; the first is equivalent to "Le falta ... a el gato." It would be the same for people:

Le fall
ó la memoria al abuelo. (when referring to someone else's abuelo; otherwise, it would be Le falló la memoria a mi abuelo.)

As you can see, I really appreciated that list of Spanish options for the word "miss."
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Old 22nd February 2009, 01:37 PM   #151
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ileanadu View Post
A while back someone asked for a translation of:

"Eramos poco, y parió la abuela."

No one gave a translation. From the way it's used, it seems that "eramos poco" is used sarcastically, so the phrase means something along the lines of "that's the last thing we needed [to happen]."

Does anyone know if that's right?
You're right! It's often said when somebody notice a new problem or inconvenience to add to a long list of issues that person is already trying to cope with. Often said when the new issue is unexpected, unusual or it comes when the person thought the situation was, finally, under control.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ileanadu View Post
As to "Como al gato que se comió el canario," I believe that "al" is a contraction of a el. "Como a" is the phrase used for comparing. So it could be written as "Como a el gato ...," but the contraction is used.
The phrase is "como el gato que se comió el canario", that is, pretending that nothing happened or conceiling him/her/itself to avoid any confrontation emerging from a misconduct.
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Old 10th March 2009, 06:36 PM   #152
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carola View Post
More expresions:

- Meter la pata: Do something wrong.
Example: Queríamos hacerle una fiesta sorpresa a Marta, pero su hermano metió la pata y se lo contó.

- Se te cae la baba: Se le cae la baba con su bebé: He dotes on his baby.
It is used too when you see a hot person, so handsome and sexy.
Example: "Ey, que se te cae la baba" someone says to you when appears this hot new teacher.
Sometimes your friend would say: "cierra la boquita..."(although your mouth is closed) because you know, se te cae la baba.

- Las reglas están para saltárselas. The rules are estabilished to break itself (Is it well estructured?)

- Es más lento que el caballo del malo: From western. It is more slow than the horse of the bad one. Because in western movie the enemie of the main character never catch (or get: atrapar?) him on time.

- No tengo abuela: I havent got grandma. It is said when someone praise themself so much, it is always the task of the grandmother so if you havent one...you do it.
Gracias, Carola--these are very interesting.

"Las reglas están para saltárselas" - Rules are made to be broken.

"Es más lento que el caballo del malo" - malo = "bad guy."
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Old 17th September 2009, 02:47 PM   #153
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I heard a good one from a girl in Barcelona: "Como un pulpo en un garage" for the english idiom "like a fish out of water". Not sure if she was tomando el pelo though
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Old 17th September 2009, 07:14 PM   #154
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Quote:
Originally Posted by felipe_au View Post
I heard a good one from a girl in Barcelona: "Como un pulpo en un garage" for the english idiom "like a fish out of water". Not sure if she was tomando el pelo though
No, she wasn't. I found it in wordreference.
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Old 4th October 2009, 02:30 PM   #155
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Default Vaya hombre

Y yo uso un monton y ni cuenta me doy, vamos...
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Old 8th March 2010, 11:04 AM   #156
JolienSeed
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Lo qué es muy util es: No Sé!
this one I use very often hahaha
If you want to know some Catalan words:
Oustras (don´t know how to write it) = Oh my god!, mierda, Por dios!
bon dia = good day
mol bé(n) = very good (in spanish : muy bien)
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Old 11th March 2010, 10:57 AM   #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JolienSeed View Post
Lo qué es muy util es: No Sé!
this one I use very often hahaha
If you want to know some Catalan words:
Oustres (don´t know how to write it) = Oh my god!, mierda, Por dios!
bon dia = good day
molt bé(n) = very good (in spanish : muy bien)
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Old 11th March 2010, 09:16 PM   #158
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Thumbs up Very Useful Info

Thanks for the info Derek,

I'm just a newbie at Spanish and interesting to read through all the threads and find the little bits of useful information.
Great site and learning alot already,
Keep it up with the great tips
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Old 8th April 2010, 08:34 PM   #159
Rania
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I have read the posts till no. #46


that was fun

will come back later

thanx every1
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Old 27th August 2010, 09:33 AM   #160
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kralizec View Post
Focus on learning spanish, not Catalan.
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