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Old 23rd May 2008, 03:27 PM   #41
eldeano
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Hola mikem. Bienvenido al foro.
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Old 23rd May 2008, 04:09 PM   #42
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Leon sounds good, a small, very Castillian town where they will speak very standard Spanish and you won't find many other foreigners.
Veo que este mensaje se escribió hace bastante tiempo, pero no me puedo resistir a comentar.

León es muy bonito, barato, la gente es extrovertida y amable, la comida es genial... Y está bien, aceptamos barco, hablan un español "estandar" pero no demasiado correcto. Como ejemplo tienes el típico "marcho luego" (que está fatal). ¿Cómo se traduce eso? a ver si alguien acierta . Bueno, y si te vas ya a la zona de Ponferrada lo flipas.

Y perdón por escribir en español, pero no me veía con fuerzas para decirlo en inglés.
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Old 23rd May 2008, 05:15 PM   #43
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Y perdón por escribir en español, pero no me veía con fuerzas para decirlo en inglés.
Pues, nada de perdón. Personalmente, prefiero que escribas en español.
A propósito, mi profesora es pucelana también. A mi entender es un acento bastante neutral, bastante fácil de entender. ¡Sigue escribiendo en español!
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Old 24th May 2008, 07:42 PM   #44
Patry.
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Pues, nada de perdón. Personalmente, prefiero que escribas en español.
A propósito, mi profesora es pucelana también. A mi entender es un acento bastante neutral, bastante fácil de entender. ¡Sigue escribiendo en español!
Bueno, siempre se ha dicho que Valladolid es donde mejor se habla el español. Pero bueno, yo soy medio pucelana, por familia y porque llevo unos añitos viviendo en Valladolid, pero en realidad soy de Madrid. Todavía tiendo al "laismo" y el "ejque" me sale de vez en cuando.

Seguiré escribiendo en español
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Old 25th May 2008, 11:12 PM   #45
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Me encanta el acento de Valladolid. ¿Me oyes? ¡¡Me EN-CAN-TA!!!
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Old 2nd July 2008, 12:18 PM   #46
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Question Why Spain?

My first experience with Spain was in the third-person. My Grandfather had retired from working for the Navy, and when we would drive out from D.C. to see the grandparents in San Diego, he would often talk to us grandkids about the places that he had been to.

By far, the most intriguing were the stories of Spain. He had worked on a ship with unmanned submersibles that had helped to find one of the nuclear bombs that fell off a B-52 over Palomares, in Almería during the Cold War. For about two months he lived in the South of Spain, and he and my Grandmother always seemed to just 'light up' when they spoke of this country. In fact, they were actual 'fans' of Hemingway, and kept their home filled with an 'hispanic' air.

As luck would have it, when I was 20 years old I was assigned as a volunteer in the Canary Islands, and from 1996 to 1998 I lived on various islands there. (I was a "Mormon missionary.") That is how I really learned to speak Spanish, even though I had studied high-school Spanish in California. I loved Canarias, and not because they are a nice vacation spot, and sadly, I have not been able to go back there.

About a year after coming home, and after taking a college course on the History of Spain, I got really fired up about going to see the Peninsula for myself, at least for a semester. I took out a loan, and signed up for the classes, and it came and went so quickly I can hardly keep it all straight.
In Madrid, at a church dance, I happened to meet up with a Madrileña I had met in the Islands, who was among several people that I had lost touch with during the year I was back in the States. It was love-at-2nd-sight. I really was smitten for this Eva, from Boadilla. I even let her talk me into crashing her older sister's wedding. (She was invited, I wasn't.)
Even though I was still an outsider, it was the first time I felt that I was participating a truly Spanish event, organized entirely by Spaniards, for Spaniards, and her family seemed charming. Some of her cousins were actually on T.V. that same weekend, as banderilleros for a bullfight. (gross)
Ironically, she didn't have much time to hang out with me, as she was headed to the U.S. "to study English," as her mom put it. And I still had at least a month left before my semester was over, in Spain. So, when I finally got back to the States, totally high on Spain, Eva just happened to be living a student apartments on the same street as me, about a block away.
I officially broke up with the American girl I had been going out with, prior to leaving for Spain. (I am ashamed to admit that this is still one of the hardest things I've ever forced myself to do. I felt like such a complete jerk, but I was so sure I was "following my heart.") Anyway, Eva and I spent as much time together as possible, trying to get to know each other, and less than six months later, Eva and I got hitched, and, well you know how fairy tales end...

...Well, prior to getting married, we more or less agreed to make five-year-plans. In the beginning she had no intentions of ever go back to live in Spain, but after the first five years in the U.S. (and many circumstances beyond our control) she began to truly miss her home, and became exceedingly homesick, and really put me through hell with all her negativity and complaining about my country. Forgive me if I now take it out on Spain.
Luckily, we were was able to visit her family almost every Christmas, and she went back by herself, when her father got very sick and died, and was there to say goodbye in person, and also to attend his funeral. Of course, as soon as I got a decent vacation, and we were headed for south Florida, her mom HAS to hop a plane to come join us. Aaarrgh.
Anyway, our second five-year-plan was to come to Spain, and so here we are, finally. Film at 11.
Good thing I work in real estate and construction, it seems we came at just the right time. Oh no, wait, this is the worst time in decades. Well, it's probably all the same, even back in the States the companies I might have worked for are also making huge lay-offs, just like the one that laid me of this year in Madrid. Blessings in disguise, I say. A really, really good disguise. With Groucho Marx nose and glasses and everything.

Anybody need Spanish to English translations? ;-)
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Old 2nd July 2008, 12:44 PM   #47
Ben
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That is a great story! It's impressive to be able to make 5 year plans too, I can usually manage about 5 weeks at best....
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Old 3rd July 2008, 03:06 AM   #48
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Default 5 year plan

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That is a great story! It's impressive to be able to make 5 year plans too, I can usually manage about 5 weeks at best....
They're more 'event horizons' than plans. To be honest, it was a little bit like, we've lived where I want to live for 5 years, now it's your turn.
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Old 13th August 2008, 07:02 PM   #49
Cide Hamete Benengeli VII
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The first open question about reasons for learning Spanish has had some wonderful responses, so I thought it might be interesting to ask a similar question about Spain...

What first brought you to Spain? What kept you coming back? Why do you love it so much? What's special about the country?

Share your Spain story here!
My first exposure to Spain (apart from high school text books) was through Spanish TV Magazine, which was a video cassette series from the late 80s through early 90s that featured excerpts of programs from RTVE. Transcripts and exercises were created to go with the videos. I checked out my first tape from the library, took it home, put it the VCR, pressed play...and didn't understand a word that anyone was saying! It took a few days of watching the tapes over and over again before the window of understanding opened up.

But, it was actually meeting Spaniards in U.S. and getting to know them that made me want to go to Spain. I hope to make it, eventually. I don’t really count the weekend I spent in Madrid a few years ago.
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Old 20th August 2008, 06:26 AM   #50
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Default Why I like Spain, Majorca

Hey Ben,

The first reason I came to Spain is my friends those who have gone their told me to go .before I went, I was also wondering why these people like Spain.

Ok let me tell you my own experience:
  • Thousands of hotels are there
  • There are lot of places like Majorca, Madrid……..and lot (I cant remember the name)
  • Lots of types of hotels were there.
  • People are very friendly
  • Beach hotels are fantastic.
Those who love to stay under sun that is the best country I can recommend

I spent couple of weeks with my wife and it was fantastic. The other great thing was I found a great hotel in that area.

cheers

Last edited by Ben; 20th August 2008 at 12:38 PM.
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Old 1st September 2008, 04:50 PM   #51
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I've visited spain once every year since i was 20. Every time a different city. The first one was Seville and it was love at first sight. I love the language, the way of life, the wine, the food, the little narrow streets, the nightlife, the way they drink all the time but you never see anyone drunk.

In college many of my friends were spanish, and they taught me how to flirt in Spanish, which i've put into practise in many a tapas bar!

I've been all over Spain, top to bottom, and visited almost all the cities. What i've never done is go on a beach holiday at one of the Costa del whatever's. I prefer a city break where there are sights to be seen and genuine Spanish people to talk to/flirt with

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Old 5th September 2008, 05:05 AM   #52
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Default Queso!

Me encanta queso! I was listening to a radio show and the speaker (Steve Jenkins, a well-known American cheese-monger) was asked where he'd go for a cheese vacation. His answer was Biarritz with a visit to San Sebastian. Well, OK, we decided to take his advice. Our plan was to fly into CDG, take the train to Biarritz, then down to San Sebastian, across northern Spain, (Haro, to try Riojas - I love cheese, my husband loves red wine), hang in Barcelona a bit, then a quick stop in Avignon and back to CDG by train.
Jenkins was right. The cheese was amazing. But Spain was what captured me. Each place we visited was unique. (The Ordesa National Park was outstanding. I love the mountains. I knew then I'd return to the Pyrenees.) And how could you not love San Sebastian (Donostia) and Barcelona?
Every night people would flood the streets walking (!), hanging out with family and friends. (Families holding hands!)
The food of course is great. And the quality, and the huge variety, of the wine is a well-kept secret, at least here in the US. (And boy do I miss the sherry bars of Sevilla, and fresh-squeezed valencia orange juice that was everywhere. And where else in the world can you get crispy bocarones fritos?)
I've gone back for 2 long visits. My husband and I hope to spend a year or so in Spain after we wrap up the work thing. I just wish it wasn't such a long flight from the west coast of the US, and that the Euro would come down a bit. (Our first trip Spain was still using the peseta. That was a good deal.)
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Old 5th November 2008, 01:13 PM   #53
itsalamanca
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Default hola

Hola,
Yo visite España al verano, y me gusto mucho. Verdaderamente tenia mucho miedo de viajar, asi que contacte con una organizacion de salamanca y ella me ayudo. Ahora ella me pide que yo os recomiende a vosotros, nose si se puede, pero visitar su web: www.spanish-learning.com y desde alli podeis concertar vuestro viaje.
Pasarlo bien.

bye
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Old 13th November 2008, 11:56 PM   #54
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Why Spain?

Spain gets under the skin. It enters the veins and it stays there. You can't get rid of it. You then have to move here or keeping coming back. Often. It's as simple as that.
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Old 9th March 2009, 10:10 PM   #55
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Default First visit to Spain

Mi primera visita a España fue en 1975. Me quedé en Benalmádena Costa por dos semanas.El tiempo era muy caliente, pensé que era fantástico.

De todos modos, me encanta España y he estado en lugares maravillosos como Rhonda, Zahara del Atunes, Barcelona, Jerez de la Frontiera.
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Old 31st March 2009, 05:01 PM   #56
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In my opinion Spain is an amazing country, and I am not saying that because I am spanish, but because you can find anything you are looking for. For example. If you travel to Africa, we would say Tanzania, you can find anymals and landscapes, but barely people. If you travel around West Africa, likely yo will find markets, people and landscapes, but not animals or a few. If travelling around Europe, you can find landscapes, people and some animals.

But coming to Spain, you will find all kind of landscapes (desert in southern Spain; mountains in Northern Spain; plains in central spain and of course coastlines. Besides different kind of landscape, also you will meet very nice people everywhere, besides a very rich cuisine and good wines.

A part from these, you can explore cities with traditional architecture besides some game reserves where you can find the richest wildlife in Europe.

What happen is that in Spain only Seville, Granada, Alicante, Madrid, Barcelona and Majorca are promoted, but other great places are quite unknown.

Feel free to contac me anytime!!!
You have a slanted idea of the spanish landscape: the south of Spain is not all desert, there is of everything, Murcia that is where I live, in the south east, it belongs to one of the areas together with Alicante and Almería, more arid of Europe but even so it varies from the deserted areas until mountains with forests of pines and open moors. However, in the "north green" is the biggest desert in Europe, Las Bárdenas Reales, in the region of Navarra.

Last edited by Exocet; 31st March 2009 at 05:07 PM.
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Old 29th May 2009, 11:42 AM   #57
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You have a slanted idea of the spanish landscape: the south of Spain is not all desert, there is of everything, Murcia that is where I live, in the south east, it belongs to one of the areas together with Alicante and Almería, more arid of Europe but even so it varies from the deserted areas until mountains with forests of pines and open moors. However, in the "north green" is the biggest desert in Europe, Las Bárdenas Reales, in the region of Navarra.
I'm not sure Mikem meant that all of Southern Spain was desert. There's a hell of a lot of concrete too! We've jsut returned from the Axarquia, about 20 miles inland from Velez-Malaga, and we couldn't believe how green it was. Must be something to do with having a very wet winter. It's something that I also like about Spain, the variety of landscape is fascinating. It's possible to go from mountainous, to desert, to lush, to concrete jungle and back to beautiful campo all within a few miles in the south.
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Old 29th May 2009, 01:18 PM   #58
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Cool Spain

I didn't travel out of the UK until I was 26, actually on my honeymoon to Italy. My wife had travelled all over Europe and the US, so I had some catching up to do. My son studied Spanish to A level and is very good. His girlfriend is Dutch and teaches French and Spanish. My first visit was 8 years ago, and like most people, just loved the people, culture, values and the place. I do not like to go to Spain for an english breakfast and shudder when I hear a British voice! I started learning Spanish 4 years ago, started very slowly, as like many people of my age, didn't really learn English. I went to a language school in Malaga, the Instituto De Malaga, great experience and this set me on the right road. Now I am learning well, at my own pace and have plenty of help. I have posted today for some help with our next trip to Spain, which will be one of many.
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Old 30th May 2009, 06:56 PM   #59
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I do not like to go to Spain for an english breakfast and shudder when I hear a British voice!
¡¡¡GRACIAS!!!!

Tengo que decir que una de las cosas que realmente me disgustan de muchos Británicos es esa superioridad de "no tengo que aprender el idioma del sitio donde vivo, ellos pueden hablar Inglés", o el no mezclarse con los nativos y vivir en "Little Englands" con sus propios alcaldes, pueblos, tiendas, bares, periódicos, radios... eso no es vivir en España, es tan sólo robar tierra al país y crear una copia del vuestro pero con buen tiempo. Me apena mucho saber que hemos perdido tanta área principalmente en nuestras costas de esta forma.

Me alegro muchísimo de ver que hay algunos -aunque me temo que muy pocos- Británicos que no nos miran como inferiores y que no sólo vienen por el sol, para emborracharse, ligar, faltar al público y quejarse de que no hablamos buen Inglés.

Ojalá hubiera más como tú, Dough, el turismo Británico realmente es demasiado barato y penoso en demasiadas zonas de España, y no me importa el dinero que pueda dejar si a cambio tenemos que soportar este tipo de gentuza.

Siempre me ha molestado este tipo de turismo, y creo que incluso cuando estás de visita, es de básica educación el respetar a tus anfitriones.

¡Un beso, y a ver si hay más como tú!
Eva

--------------------------------------

THANKS!!!

I have to say that one of the things that I really find disgusting in many British people is that supperiority of yours, like "I don´t have to learn the language of the place where I live, they can speak English", or that not mixing up with the natives and live in "Little Englands" with your own local representants, villages, shops, pubs, papers, radio channels... This is not living in Spain, it´s simply taking land from the country and create a copy of your own but with good weather. I´m terribly sad that we have lost so much area particularly in our coast like this.

I´m very happy to see that there are some -although I fear very few- British that do not look at us as inferior people and that don´t come only for the sun, to get drunk, to be a public annoyance and to compain that we cannot speak good English.

I wish there were more like you, Dough, British tourism is really cheap and disgusting in too many areas in Spain, and I don´t care about the money it might leave behind if we have to suffer this kind of rabble.

I always feel upset by this kind of tourism, and believe that even if you are simply visiting the place, it is basic manners to respect your hosts.

A kiss for you, and I hope there will be more like you!
Eva
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Old 30th May 2009, 10:32 PM   #60
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Tengo que decir que una de las cosas que realmente me disgustan de muchos Británicos es esa superioridad de "no tengo que aprender el idioma del sitio donde vivo, ellos pueden hablar Inglés", o el no mezclarse con los nativos y vivir en "Little Englands" con sus propios alcaldes, pueblos, tiendas, bares, periódicos, radios... eso no es vivir en España, es tan sólo robar tierra al país y crear una copia del vuestro pero con buen tiempo.
Funny, there are a lot of Spaniards who want to live in Miami or Los Angeles for the exact same reasons -- Majority Spanish-speaking community where speaking English is unnecessary to live or work. Eva, I hope you're not one of those Spaniards who assumes that everything Spanish is perfect and everything Anglo is "cheap and disgusting."
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