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Old 17th November 2008, 06:39 PM   #21
richardksa
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I think it would be a good idea for Bri10s to find a British intercambio. In Seville, that should not be difficult.
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Old 17th November 2008, 08:10 PM   #22
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Intersting and amusing thread. Didn┤t realy think about these until I also spoke them outloud. The only one that temporarily puzzles me is when I hear 9/11 and I have to think about the month/day order between the UK and the States.
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Old 17th November 2008, 09:43 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by richardksa View Post
I think it would be a good idea for Bri10s to find a British intercambio. In Seville, that should not be difficult.

haha de verdad. one of my friends here is british (another auxiliar), but i dont see her that often, and haven't for a few weeks. otherwise, i dont normally hang out with brits, although i hear a lot of british english on the streets. my group of friends is otherwise representative of the UN though, jaja (my travel group this weekend consisted of germans, austrians mexicans, frenchies, belgians, slovenians, and italians!)

thanks for all the help! and i'm sure i'll have more doubts and need some more confirmation after work tomorrow

ps....i loved the story about "knocking you up." i for sure would have had the same expression as the woman. oh, and i'm almost positive that this was just a really badly chosen idiom to teach...but you dont actually use the phrase "lets have a whale of a time" up there still, do you? my spanish friend said it to me last year, and i stared at him for a few seconds before cracking up
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Old 17th November 2008, 10:22 PM   #24
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Quote:
I remember writing dates with the month in Roman Numerals so that it was absolutely clear which number was which - for instance November 17, 2008 would be written 17-XI-2008. Is this still common?
I have seen that done in a multinational pharmaceutical company to prevent confusion and also in an a public forensic organisation.

Apart from those two examples - never. Makes sense though. I work for an American company and I tend to write dd mmm yy - e.g. 20 Nov 2008.
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Old 18th November 2008, 08:03 PM   #25
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To further confuse the on/in street argument - I would say that I live on London Road, but that I live in Cavendish Square.

Maybe I would live in a Lane, Alley, Way, Mead ....(I actually did live in Crofter's Mead).

But on a Street, Road, Mile, Avenue, ....

any more?
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Old 18th November 2008, 09:36 PM   #26
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[quote=Steve W;65073]To further confuse the on/in street argument - I would say that I live on London Road, but that I live in Cavendish Square. quote]


actually, i agree with you on that one, because a square is something you can live in the middle of. like, i used to live in plaza ruiz de alda here in sevilla. but i would always live on a street, avenue, road, way etc. hmmm
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Old 18th November 2008, 11:22 PM   #27
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i asked some friends, general concencus was they just say 'i live 'ern'(kinda grunt-y sound) highsted road' and kinda mumble it.

i know this isnt proper english but suppose its an answer to the question... whats happening to the youth of today!
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Old 19th November 2008, 04:29 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve W View Post
To further confuse the on/in street argument - I would say that I live on London Road, but that I live in Cavendish Square.

Maybe I would live in a Lane, Alley, Way, Mead ....(I actually did live in Crofter's Mead).

But on a Street, Road, Mile, Avenue, ....

any more?
Boulevard, on or in?
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Old 19th November 2008, 09:07 PM   #29
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As Winston Churchill once remarked: "Britain and America are two nations separated by a common language". I found this out, to my cost, when I worked for a US multinational for many years.
I've heard it was George Bernard Shaw who is alleged to have said that quote.

And who do we have to blame in part for the differences. Yes. Noah Webster.

OP: Now, don't go getting mad that there are differences when an American man set out to specifically seperate the two!!. Obviously the differences can also be attributed to a lot of other things too....
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Old 19th November 2008, 10:36 PM   #30
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Well I heard it was Oscar Wilde - and if it wasn't he would have wished it was.

GBS of course tried to promote his shavian spelling to simplify English spelling. I really feel for the Spanish when they get to the "OUGH" bits of our words. And Webster was sucessful in his attempt, although it didn't go as far as Shaw wanted. Of course no one of wrong and viva la diference.
BUT, if you want to adjust words stop calling it English!!!!
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Old 19th November 2008, 10:48 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richardksa View Post
Well I heard it was Oscar Wilde - and if it wasn't he would have wished it was.

GBS of course tried to promote his shavian spelling to simplify English spelling. I really feel for the Spanish when they get to the "OUGH" bits of our words. And Webster was sucessful in his attempt, although it didn't go as far as Shaw wanted. Of course no one of wrong and viva la diference.
BUT, if you want to adjust words stop calling it English!!!!
Engrish, AMericanise, Yanquellego,

and in W Bushes case : WTF
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Old 19th November 2008, 11:03 PM   #32
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I┤ve sat here for a few minutes trying to contemplate this ┤in┤ or ┤on┤ question and for me its the same as for Steve W

ValenciaSon, on.
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Old 20th November 2008, 02:24 AM   #33
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In response to the original post:

Quote:
book says (in a chapter on hotels):
A: Have you (got) a room? (with the "got" being optional)
B: No, we haven't.
I would never miss out the "got" in that question. It sounds rather posh without it. (Altough I don't really like the usage (mine included) of the word "got" inplace of more appropriate verbs!)

"We have not got a room" sounds fine to me. But then I again, it's not a phrase I would hear as I probably wouldn't ask the question like that. It's a bit "simple" "do you have a room", "no we dont, "thank you. good bye" jaja

I'm sure you can find all of your doubts online.. I know Wikipedia is extremely comprhensive on the issue of BrE and AmE!

Question for you:
Quote:
since there are an abundance of brits on this site
That sounded weird to me, is that an American thing? Abundance is singular therefore should it be "is" ?

Last edited by switch007; 20th November 2008 at 02:40 AM.
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Old 20th November 2008, 10:32 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by switch007 View Post
I've heard it was George Bernard Shaw who is alleged to have said that quote.
Quite right! GBS, Wilde and Churchill all said the same thing in different words- take your choice.
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Old 20th November 2008, 11:02 AM   #35
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Quote:
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Question for you: That sounded weird to me, is that an American thing? Abundance is singular therefore should it be "is" ?
True, but is very colloquial. "The herd of cows are going to be milked", "The flock of geese are flying south for the winter". It's almost as if the collective noun has become an adjective. But say, "The herd", "The Flock" alone and most people would use "is". Sometimes grammar goes out the window in favour of what sounds better.
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Old 20th November 2008, 04:12 PM   #36
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Those of us with an interest in the use of language may, if you have half an hour to spare, like to listen to this year's Alistair Cooke lecture. It is delivered by David Marnet and, until he gets a little political and preachy, is an interesting discussion of the use of language. You can find it here.
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Old 20th November 2008, 07:22 PM   #37
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Default Question !!!

At the Valencian Manises airport, there is a lift and a subway united. Is lift an england word or is elevator the word used in the islands ?
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Old 20th November 2008, 08:16 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richardksa View Post
True, but is very colloquial. "The herd of cows are going to be milked", "The flock of geese are flying south for the winter". It's almost as if the collective noun has become an adjective. But say, "The herd", "The Flock" alone and most people would use "is". Sometimes grammar goes out the window in favour of what sounds better.
The 'of cows' is actually the adjectival phrase and, colloquially, as the phrase includes a plural noun the person of the verb reflects this. Sounds dreadful to me.... as does 'an abundance' with 'are'...
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Old 20th November 2008, 10:33 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gary View Post
The 'of cows' is actually the adjectival phrase and, colloquially, as the phrase includes a plural noun the person of the verb reflects this. Sounds dreadful to me.... as does 'an abundance' with 'are'...
Aye.

And what about stand-alone singular nouns representing entities, such as corporations, companies, teams, and so on...

The BBC are...
Ford are...
The Government are...
England are...

etc.
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Old 21st November 2008, 02:24 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gastephen View Post
Aye.

And what about stand-alone singular nouns representing entities, such as corporations, companies, teams, and so on...

The BBC are...
Ford are...
The Government are...
England are...

etc.
You are "supposed" to use the singular verb "is" if the entity is acting as a whole, but if there is division amongst the entity or it is acting in multiple ways for some reason, you use the plural. But most people just use the singular verb all the time anyway, b/c using the plural often sounds awkward since we're so used to the singular.

For example:

The Congress is meeting.
The Congress are debating over the issue.

My family is at the restaurant.
My family are ordering different items.

In both first sentences, there is no dispute over anything. In the second, there is dispute or differing actions.

They still sound weird to me though
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