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Old 9th December 2006, 03:05 PM   #1
ValenciaSon
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Default Pollo en Pepitoria - Cuisine from Spain Podcast 18

Sounds like a delicious dish. I might try cooking this one myself.

I have a question if I may. Will it taste the same if one doesn't use Bouquet Garni? You say use bay leaves instead, but did you say that the bouquet garni has other herbs like thyme, oregano and others? So shouldn't one add those as well to the mix?

I enjoyed the podcast. I liked the atmosphere capture of the market. It was nice to hear Ryan and Gabriela also. I know you went to a different market but I've heard that the mercado central of Barcelona is supposed to be one of the finest in all of Europe. What I also heard is that if there is hugely expensive banquet to be planned in Europe, the chefs will go to the mercado central in Barcelona to purchase the ingredients. Have you had a chance to visit this mercado? Maybe it can be a future podcast?

Thanks again
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Old 10th December 2006, 03:53 PM   #2
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This website gives a few hints on creating your own boquet garni, (which I had never heard of before today). They mention that the most basic boquet garni has 3 stalks of parsley, one sprig of thyme, and a bay leaf.
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Old 10th December 2006, 03:57 PM   #3
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I was just at that site yesterday. I also went to others. Half say use cheesecloth if not using twine. The other half say stay away from cheesecloth because it prevents herb transfer into the dish in preparation.
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Old 10th December 2006, 04:23 PM   #4
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The other half say stay away from cheesecloth because it prevents herb transfer into the dish in preparation.
That actually makes sense, but I wouldn't know where to buy cheesecloth to start with!
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Old 10th December 2006, 06:21 PM   #5
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I have just opened one bouquet that I had at home -which doesn't come from Terrasa market- and found 5 bay leafs covering mainly thyme stalks but also a couple of oregano stalks and a couple of thyme flowers.

If you don't have the bouquet I would use some of the following herbs: a few bay leafs -be generous-, thyme or/and rosemary.

My mother cooks it with only 2 bayleaves and it is usually delicious. By the way the secret is the slow cooking.

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Old 10th December 2006, 07:38 PM   #6
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By the way the secret is the slow cooking.
It's funny you say that Marina because it occurred to me that maybe I could prepare this in our slow-cooker.
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Old 10th December 2006, 08:23 PM   #7
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Sorry, what is exactly a slow-cooker?

Last edited by Ben; 28th January 2007 at 08:51 PM.
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Old 10th December 2006, 08:29 PM   #8
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Sorry, what is exactly a slow-cooker?
It's also called a crock pot. They're great for cooking roasts and stews. Just throw the ingredients in in the morning before work, and when you get home, you have a delicious meal.
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Old 10th December 2006, 08:30 PM   #9
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Quote:
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I have just opened one bouquet that I had at home -which doesn't come from Terrasa market- and found 5 bay leafs covering mainly thyme stalks but also a couple of oregano stalks and a couple of thyme flowers.

If you don't have the bouquet I would use some of the following herbs: a few bay leafs -be generous-, thyme or/and rosemary.

My mother cooks it with only 2 bayleaves and it is usually delicious. By the way the secret is the slow cooking.
Speaking of spices, every time we go to Spain, the wife brings back several vasitos of "Hierbas Provenzales." Have you heard of this spice blend, and if so, do you use it often?
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Old 10th December 2006, 10:34 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marina View Post
Sorry, what is exactly a slow-cooker?
As Brian describes, it allows one to prepare food in advance as it slowly cooks it. This works great for stews and certain meats such as flank steak. It renders the meat tender and maximizes the opportunity for herbs and spices to become absorbed by the food. Using a slow-cooker for recipes which include bouquet de garni sounds ideal.
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Old 10th December 2006, 11:11 PM   #11
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Hey ValenciaSon, would you ask your parents about Hierbas Provenzales? I'm curious if their use is widespread.
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Old 10th December 2006, 11:19 PM   #12
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My folks never heard of them.
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Old 10th December 2006, 11:42 PM   #13
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My folks never heard of them.
ok, thanks! I did some searching and found that it's a blend of several spices, and has French origins, but its use has become more common locally.

*Hierbas Provenzales o de Provenza
Las venden en las tiendas, es más fácil que conseguirlas frescas. Se ponen a secar y se mezclan, o frescas son una delicia. Pero recordemos que las Hierbas de Provenza son las que se recolectan en determinadas áreas, y no están siempre juntas. Por ello decía que era más fácil comprarlas en un almacén de comestibles. Generalmente vienen de Francia.
- Albahaca dulce
- Romero
- Salvia
- Hinojo
- Laurel
- Tomillo
- Enebro
- Orégano
- Eneldo
- Cebollino
- Estragón
- Mejorana
- Menta
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Old 11th December 2006, 02:17 AM   #14
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What dishes are the hierbas provenzales used for?
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Old 11th December 2006, 02:47 AM   #15
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Quote:
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What dishes are the hierbas provenzales used for?
Just about everything. My wife uses it like Season-All, especially in beef/pork dishes.
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Old 11th December 2006, 08:26 AM   #16
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Quote:
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What dishes are the hierbas provenzales used for?
I use it a lot (under its French name "herbes de provence" ) for lamb and pork (esp. when marinating before grilling).
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Old 11th December 2006, 11:01 AM   #17
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I have Hierbas Provenzales at home and despite being available in most of the supermarkets I wouldn't say that their use is widespread in Spain.

They are generally very nice with meat, apart from the examples added by Diana and Brian I would also use it with chicken. But to tell you the truth I don't use it very often as I usually prefer not to mixing many herbs in one plate being my favourite combination thyme and bayleafs.
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Old 11th December 2006, 01:55 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marina View Post
I have Hierbas Provenzales at home and despite being available in most of the supermarkets I wouldn't say that their use is widespread in Spain.

They are generally very nice with meat, apart from the examples added by Diana and Brian I would also use it with chicken. But to tell you the truth I don't use it very often as I usually prefer not to mixing many herbs in one plate being my favourite combination thyme and bayleafs.
It seems to me that hierbas provenzales is unusually complex for spanish cuisine, which I thought of as much simpler with its fewer ingredients, and of course excellent.

I'm not knocking the hierbas, I am curious and definitely want to try it.
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Old 12th December 2006, 12:51 AM   #19
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Quote:
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It seems to me that hierbas provenzales is unusually complex for spanish cuisine, which I thought of as much simpler with its fewer ingredients, and of course excellent.

I'm not knocking the hierbas, I am curious and definitely want to try it.
The magic of HP is its subtlety. There isn't really an overpowering taste, so the blend doesn't smack your tongue like pop rocks.
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Old 14th December 2006, 03:33 PM   #20
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Do you keep the HP in for the duration of cooking whatever dish you're making?
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