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Old 20th July 2006, 10:08 AM   #41
gary
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan
As long as the beer is cheap, they´re happy.
This has never ceased to amaze me. Some years ago I went on a trip on a coach - my mate runs the company and we got a good deal as we were out of our entertainment business retirement providing the 'talent' in the hotel in the days. The clientelle are invariably pensioners. Every day the main topic of conversation consisted of the following
  • the best exchange rate (they walked miles to make an extra few cents - no one had a bank card)
  • the pub where the cheapest beer was that did the best all day full English for lunch
  • the tabac with the cheapest fags
  • where you could get the cheapest spirits from
  • the fact that the wine that was provided with dinner tasted like vinagre (it was simply dry but very drinkable)
  • complaining about the price of the Sun / Mirror / Star
I know they are a generation that won at least one war, I have massive respect for them - my uncle has always refused to go abroad as he says he saw enough of the world between 1939 and 1945 to last him a lifetime - then he winks asd says " and they paid ME!"

I am saddened that they are a generation that have such a suspicion of everything around them when they are in another country and can only be comfortable surrounded by trappings of home. Even my mum when we took her to Lanzarote insisted on spending three times the money on UK branded stuff and wouldnt eat out because £12 was too expensive for a steak ( it was 1200 pesetas - a fiver - but we couldnt convince her.

If anyone is considering coach transport to go on holiday my advice is to avoid the 19 hours overnight in the coach unless you weigh less than ten stone, are under 5 foot tall and have a 24 inch inside leg - ie quite comfortable for kids. I once thought it would be nice to stick the kids - 14 and 11 at the time on a coach and for me anf Gill to fly and pick them up at the other end....then I woke up!!
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Old 20th July 2006, 11:27 AM   #42
Edith
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[quote=gary]the tabac with the cheapest fags
  • where you could get the cheapest spirits from
  • the fact that the wine that was provided with dinner tasted like vinagre (it was simply dry but very drinkable)
  • quote]
Are you sure these expats weren't Dutch? Somos una nación de tacaños.
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Old 20th July 2006, 11:36 AM   #43
richardksa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gary
If anyone is considering coach transport to go on holiday my advice is to avoid the 19 hours overnight in the coach unless you weigh less than ten stone, are under 5 foot tall and have a 24 inch inside leg - ie quite comfortable for kids. I once thought it would be nice to stick the kids - 14 and 11 at the time on a coach and for me anf Gill to fly and pick them up at the other end....then I woke up!!
I used to think the same, then needing a cheap break I took a coach trip to north Italy. (And was dreading it!) I was wrong. Within the first couple of hours we were like one happy family: Life stories swapped, jokes cracked a determination that, while we were stuck in this contraption for the next 24 hours, we were going to make the best of it.

There were a few that kept trying to work out the cost of everything in pounds, but my attitude was that if you wanted a coffee and it cost x euros, that was what you paid and stopped quibbling. Most people were like me.

But I will always remember the Yorkshireman who insisted the that Italian and Spanish were really the same language just pronounced differently and insisted in addressing all waiters in tourist Spanish. They just shrugged their shoulders and took their tips.
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Old 20th July 2006, 11:39 AM   #44
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[quote=Edith]
Quote:
Originally Posted by gary
the tabac with the cheapest fags
  • where you could get the cheapest spirits from
  • the fact that the wine that was provided with dinner tasted like vinagre (it was simply dry but very drinkable)
  • quote]
Are you sure these expats weren't Dutch? Somos una nación de tacaños.
err, the dutch speaking their own language sound very much like the english from the Yorkshire coast, so no - apart from the fact I dont speak dutch - we are only a separate people because of the north sea...

They definitely Were not belgians because they were not in bed by 10pm!!
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Old 20th July 2006, 12:14 PM   #45
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[quote=gary]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edith

err, the dutch speaking their own language sound very much like the english from the Yorkshire coast!!
Really! That's interesting! I remember watching 'All Creatures Great And Small' about James Herriot's adventures in Yorkshire. The local dialect has a nice sound to it. Oh and by the way, I loved the series.

Frisian (a minority language from the north of Holland) is said to be even more like English in some respects.

Anyway, to get back on topic, Dutch people are always hunting for bargains, wherever they happen to be. In parts of the Middle East, local hawkers and vendors will call after you, 'Kijken, kijken, niet kopen! (Pidgin Dutch for 'looking, just looking, not buying anything!') In Spain, the Dutch have their own expat communities, although they are considerably smaller than their British counterparts. And I have been told Mallorca is run by the Germans.

Last edited by Edith; 20th July 2006 at 12:43 PM.
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Old 20th July 2006, 12:59 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gary
I am saddened that they are a generation that have such a suspicion of everything around them when they are in another country and can only be comfortable surrounded by trappings of home.
My grandfathers were all the same way. They all went overseas for WW2 and came back with no desire ever to travel more than 100 miles from home again. It was just a different generation.

That American generation was also forged in thriftiness by the Great Depression in the 1930s. Never trusting banks, my great-grandmother would squirrel away large amounts of cash under the sofa cushion, behind a picture, in a slit in the wallpaper. When she died, they had a heck of a time finding all her money. I bet there's still stashes of it in that house!
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Old 20th July 2006, 01:50 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rob
I'm off to Cala Blanca for the 3rd year in a row on Friday. It seems like a quaint little place, very quiet and very boring unless you start moving around the place.

Have you found any gems in Ciutadella, I've been there before but I've seen the market and the harbour and don't seem to have found much else there. Also, I have no idea how to pronounce the name because everytime I tried the bus drivers gave me a confused look and didn't seem to understand.

I know they speak Menorquín and I assume they all speak Spanish too but I wondered if the Menorcans were a little like the Catalonians in that they are very proud of their language to the point where some will refuse to talk to you if you speka to them in Spanish.

Anyway, ramble over
If it´s your third year here, I´d bet you know the place better than me. Ciutadella, as far as I can tell, is pronounced as in Spanish with a soft C (i.e. not a ´th` sound). Syootadeya. I´ve also heard the t being omitted, i.e. Syooadeya. I´ve been complimented for my Spanish pronunciation - something I can attribute to my being Scottish - because I pronounce the vowels very clearly. An ´a´ is an ´ah´ sound to me, and not ´aee´ as in many English dialects. I didn´t notice where you are from and it doesn´t seem to be on the page now. But the main language is Catalan (or more correctly Menorquín) and it is clear that Castellano is secondary. However, Castellano is much more easily understood by Menorcans than English and I would still use it. I´ve found myself well accepted by using it. It also helps if you can announce that you can´t speak Menorquín or Catalan, but you´re happy to speak Castellano.

The ´population´ here seems to be largely migratory. The island seems to shut in the winter due to its heavy dependency on tourism and because of this many of the people working here in the summer are not Menorcan. I´ve spoken to staff from all over Europe (Italy, England, France, Germany, Barcelona, Asturias :P), and for them, Castellano or English are the preferred languages.

As for gems, not really. It´s a small town and nothing is hiding. The restaurants on the seafront are overpriced, but okay if you like the view. There are also a few restaurants on the touristy pedestrianised street heading up from the municipal buildings which are nice. Café Es Pou is particularly good (and cheap). We haven´t spent a lot of time in Ciutadella because our hotel food is so good and because we´ve been going around the rest of the island.

Where will you be staying?

Alan
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Old 20th July 2006, 01:53 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richardksa

But I will always remember the Yorkshireman who insisted the that Italian and Spanish were really the same language just pronounced differently and insisted in addressing all waiters in tourist Spanish. They just shrugged their shoulders and took their tips.
Well, they kinda are. But with that logic, so are Dutch and German or Scottish and Irish Gaelic. They´re very closely related and you can see how the words have morphed. If you can speak Spanish, then all you need to do is apply a few rules and you won´t be far off.
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Old 23rd July 2006, 12:08 PM   #49
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Well, I'm very sad to have returned to Scotland. I'll post my photos on http://www.notesfromspain.com/forums...read.php?t=533

Alan
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Old 23rd July 2006, 01:06 PM   #50
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We will look forward to that. In the meantime, to give you one more reason to wish you were back in Spain, see this:
http://news.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=1068392006
The county's going mad.
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Old 23rd July 2006, 02:21 PM   #51
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So what is the Health & Safety view of facing enemy bullets?
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Old 23rd July 2006, 03:06 PM   #52
Alan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richardksa
We will look forward to that. In the meantime, to give you one more reason to wish you were back in Spain, see this:
http://news.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=1068392006
The county's going mad.
Yeah, thanks for that

I actually play the pipes (not the Highland Bagpipe, but smaller pipes, imaginatively called the Scottish Small Pipes) so that piece of news particularly annoys me.
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Old 24th July 2006, 04:16 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValenciaSon
I wonder if there is any chinese restaurant in Spain that combines asiatic and iberian cooking. In New York there is a number of chinese-cuban restaurants. The owners are chinese who migrated to Cuba and later to the US. Their menus at first glance appear unremarkably chinese however, when looking further you find cuban dishes and/or when sampling you find the chinese dishes have a definite cuban influence. It is quite tasty. I've heard that in Rome, Italy, there is a chinese neighborhood with restaurants which has hybridized both italian and chinese cuisines with excellent results.
Peru has an excellent example of chinese fusion food - one of its national dishes, Chifa.
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