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Old 2nd March 2009, 07:05 AM   #1
Gringo Sean
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Default Andaba muy contento




Se que hice unos errores porque hablaba rapido porque estaba enmocianado como dije. En este, dije "alli esta mi hermana" pero ella queria que yo la quitara del video, no se porque.
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Old 2nd March 2009, 10:47 AM   #2
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You did great¡¡, but it's funny because you have a south american accent. In Spain we pronounce quite different, but well done¡¡
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Old 2nd March 2009, 03:42 PM   #3
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haha, sure it's not a Central American accent?
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Old 2nd March 2009, 03:47 PM   #4
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So you have a Queens accent, then.
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Old 2nd March 2009, 05:28 PM   #5
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haha, sure it's not a Central American accent?
Yes, sorry , your accent is more similar to a mexican, you used some typical mexican expresions , but i guess in USA mexican accent has more influence than spanish (from Spain) version.
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Old 4th March 2009, 04:32 AM   #6
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^the spanish that is spoken here, definately. However, the Spanish taught in school is almost always based on Spanish from Spain.

but what were the typical mexican phrases I used? haha

by the way, any errors? (besides me stuttering a little when i was talking too fast there)
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Old 4th March 2009, 06:26 AM   #7
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the first time i saw one of your videos i thought it was somewhat of a mexican accent...now im thinking a bit of cuban...maybe a bit of puerto riquean. i dont know haha
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Old 5th March 2009, 12:28 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Gringo Sean View Post
^the spanish that is spoken here, definately. However, the Spanish taught in school is almost always based on Spanish from Spain.
The Spanish taught in US schools is not based off of the way spaniards speak.
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Old 5th March 2009, 01:18 AM   #9
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The Spanish taught in US schools is not based off of the way spaniards speak.
It depends, the accent isn't taught, but often times they make students learn the vosotros form. I think learning the voseo is much more pertinent than the vosotros, since vos is used in so many other places.
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Old 5th March 2009, 01:24 AM   #10
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It depends, the accent isn't taught, but often times they make students learn the vosotros form. I think learning the voseo is much more pertinent than the vosotros, since vos is used in so many other places.
From what my teacher told me, who has been a spanish teacher for over 30 years, they teach vosotros not because they teach el castellano from Spain but rather because you will find it used a lot in classic literature. Other than that we learn more of a latin american spanish. And from my experience I've spent a grand total of 40 minutes throughout my entire 4 years of learning spanish in a Maryland public school system on the vosotros forms.
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Old 5th March 2009, 02:54 AM   #11
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Well based on my personal experiences learning Spanish in High school was based on Castellano Spanish. Any classroom I ever sat in had a Spanish flag. Any listening comprehension I ever practiced in school was created by Spaniards. Any geography focused on Spain.

Maybe its only NY. But speaking/interacting-wise, I don't think I've ever actually spoken Spanish to someone from Spain. Almost only Central-Americans, and few South-Americans.
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Old 5th March 2009, 11:35 AM   #12
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All the classrooms here have a spanish and mexican flag at least. But we don't learn spanish vernacular, accent, nor anything Spain specific except for history and geography in spanish IV. In all the other classes we learn Latin American culture and customs. As far as listening comprehension we only listen to basically Mexican accents (we watch univision which is an american station but I think it's run by mexican-americans) and we learn latin american grammar over spanish in the few minor differences, probably because the minor differences make latin american spanish closer to english.

You're lucky to get exposed to a wide variety of accents.
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Old 5th March 2009, 05:55 PM   #13
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¡Muy bien, Sean! Tu acento parece paraguayo por momentos, pero la mayor parte del tiempo es "Caribbean Rim", más bien centroamericano, pero con elementos de otras zonas de la América cálida. Muy pocos sonidos no hispanos.

Lo del vocabulario y algunas invenciones, bueno, supongo que era las altas horas de la noche más el frío de carámbanos que hacía.

Lo del garage más frío que el aire libre me hizo recordar lo de esa casa tan fría, pero tan fría, que la gente pasaba y gritaba "¡Cierren la puerta, que se enfría la calle!"
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Old 12th March 2009, 12:34 AM   #14
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Are you talking about high school or college?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsayk View Post
All the classrooms here have a spanish and mexican flag at least. But we don't learn spanish vernacular, accent, nor anything Spain specific except for history and geography in spanish IV. In all the other classes we learn Latin American culture and customs. As far as listening comprehension we only listen to basically Mexican accents
????????

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...probably because the minor differences make latin american spanish closer to english.
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Old 12th March 2009, 01:08 AM   #15
Cide Hamete Benengeli VII
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In my opinion, the fact that the vosotros is very often not actively taught in American high schools and the almost total exclusion of even any mention of vos is a combination of laziness and ignorance. It's mostly laziness when it comes to vosotros, because it is almost always included in high school textbooks for teaching Spanish.

The lame excuse that Spanish teachers in my high school would often use was "nobody uses the vosotros anymore...well, except for Spain". So let me get this straight, over 40 million people qualify as 'nobody'? It gets to be a vicious circle after awhile. These teachers never really had to learn it themselves when they were in school, so once they become teachers it's simply easier not to require their students to learn it either. What makes this so egregious is that Spain is still the NUMBER ONE destination for American students of Spanish studying abroad.

At the same time many of the same teachers claim that they are teaching "Latin American Spanish". That assertion alone shows that they don't have a clue. But, to add insult to injury they don't even mention vos. According to experts in Spanish dialectology, the voseo is THE distinguishing characteristic of Spanish spoken in the Americas. Its exclusion from the classroom is mostly down to ignorance of its very existence. Sadly, most of the people who end up teaching high school Spanish in the U.S. are not the most knowledgeable.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsayk View Post
From what my teacher told me, who has been a spanish teacher for over 30 years, they teach vosotros not because they teach el castellano from Spain but rather because you will find it used a lot in classic literature. Other than that we learn more of a latin american spanish. And from my experience I've spent a grand total of 40 minutes throughout my entire 4 years of learning spanish in a Maryland public school system on the vosotros forms.
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Old 12th March 2009, 02:20 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cide Hamete Benengeli VII View Post
In my opinion, the fact that the vosotros is very often not actively taught in American high schools and the almost total exclusion of even any mention of vos is a combination of laziness and ignorance. It's mostly laziness when it comes to vosotros, because it is almost always included in high school textbooks for teaching Spanish.

The lame excuse that Spanish teachers in my high school would often use was "nobody uses the vosotros anymore...well, except for Spain". So let me get this straight, over 40 million people qualify as 'nobody'? It gets to be a vicious circle after awhile. These teachers never really had to learn it themselves when they were in school, so once they become teachers it's simply easier not to require their students to learn it either. What makes this so egregious is that Spain is still the NUMBER ONE destination for American students of Spanish studying abroad.

At the same time many of the same teachers claim that they are teaching "Latin American Spanish". That assertion alone shows that they don't have a clue. But, to add insult to injury they don't even mention vos. According to experts in Spanish dialectology, the voseo is THE distinguishing characteristic of Spanish spoken in the Americas. Its exclusion from the classroom is mostly down to ignorance of its very existence. Sadly, most of the people who end up teaching high school Spanish in the U.S. are not the most knowledgeable.
Yes, I was talking about High School. And yes, most of the spanish teachers I've encountered are less than qualified but they can teach beginners fairly well. My one spanish teacher didn't even know what the voseo was until I showed her.
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Old 12th March 2009, 03:45 AM   #17
Gringo Sean
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cide Hamete Benengeli VII View Post
In my opinion, the fact that the vosotros is very often not actively taught in American high schools and the almost total exclusion of even any mention of vos is a combination of laziness and ignorance. It's mostly laziness when it comes to vosotros, because it is almost always included in high school textbooks for teaching Spanish.

The lame excuse that Spanish teachers in my high school would often use was "nobody uses the vosotros anymore...well, except for Spain". So let me get this straight, over 40 million people qualify as 'nobody'? It gets to be a vicious circle after awhile. These teachers never really had to learn it themselves when they were in school, so once they become teachers it's simply easier not to require their students to learn it either. What makes this so egregious is that Spain is still the NUMBER ONE destination for American students of Spanish studying abroad.

At the same time many of the same teachers claim that they are teaching "Latin American Spanish". That assertion alone shows that they don't have a clue. But, to add insult to injury they don't even mention vos. According to experts in Spanish dialectology, the voseo is THE distinguishing characteristic of Spanish spoken in the Americas. Its exclusion from the classroom is mostly down to ignorance of its very existence. Sadly, most of the people who end up teaching high school Spanish in the U.S. are not the most knowledgeable.
I agree with everything. Especially the last part.

To be honest I never use the vosotros because I was honestly never taught it, and also the people I work with (who are all from Guatemala pretty much) say they fully understand it but never use it. I would use it constantly if I was around it, because to me using good grammar is very important.

I also agree about what you said about American people teaching Spanish in HS. Alot of the teachers I had weren't able to converse (apart from two, one being born in Ecuador and the other having spent a year in Spain) very well.

Me for example, all the native speakers obviously know my Spanish isn't the greatest, but I feel very comfortable conversing at work/helping Hispanic customers and so on.
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