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Old 19th January 2009, 05:54 PM   #1
switch007
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Default salir del paso

Hey,

I'm trying to translate this correctly into English:

Quote:
El ministro de Trabajo, Celestino Corbacho, sale al paso de la polémica defendiendo los centros separados para alumnos inmigrantes.
Rae says: "darse por enterado de ello e impugnar su veracidad o su fundamento." Is that "to acknlowedge ?? and contest its truthfullness o its foundations"

Although in the sentance above I'm not sure how to translate "sale el paso de la polemica defendiendo.." correctly.

My guess: "He disregards/dismisses the controversy, defending the seperated centers for immigrant students"

Thanks!!
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Old 19th January 2009, 07:21 PM   #2
aleCcowaN
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Yes, "salir(le) al paso" could be "disregard". As an image "salir al paso" is meeting someone on the way, for instance, the enemy is going to attack a city and your army "le sale al paso", that is, your army deploys in front of the enemy -in their way- before they reach their objective. In figurative sense, "salir al paso" means disregard, but there's a nuance of "actively preventing the develop of something".

On the contrary, "salir del paso" means something like "pulling through", it's to come successfully through illness, troubles or any potentially harmful situation.
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Old 20th January 2009, 05:13 PM   #3
Urgellenk
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Rather than disregard, I believe that "salir al paso" has a meaning of facing or confronting the controversy.
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Old 21st January 2009, 05:10 PM   #4
Petrichor
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Quote:
El ministro de Trabajo, Celestino Corbacho, sale al paso de la polémica defendiendo los centros separados para alumnos inmigrantes.
How about: 'The minister is tackling the controversy head on and defending separate centres for immigrant students.'
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Old 22nd January 2009, 10:55 AM   #5
barry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
Yes, "salir(le) al paso" could be "disregard". As an image "salir al paso" is meeting someone on the way, for instance, the enemy is going to attack a city and your army "le sale al paso", that is, your army deploys in front of the enemy -in their way- before they reach their objective. In figurative sense, "salir al paso" means disregard, but there's a nuance of "actively preventing the develop of something".
The background to this polémica is quite interesting. I read in the Czech Republican press of the situation regarding segregation of ethnic minories in education and other social issues, and spanish professionals are actively engaged there in the implementation of the spanish model. That is, throwing all minority groups in the deep end and treating them as nationals without favour or prejudice.

In Spain this has resulted in an increasing the number of graduate 'gitanos' and a decrease in the number of ghettos, in comparison with the old model of providing special schools, which also gave rise to complaints about favouritism towards minority groups , especially 'los gitanos'.

The curious thing in this instance is the decision by El ministro de Trabajo to not only provide separate schools but also to focus on teaching the immigrants Catalan. This really does fly in the face of central government guidelines.

In this context maybe 'sale al paso' might mean something like 'bypass' but it seems to me a little soft considering the background and might be rather more like ' slamming the door' de la polémica.

Regards
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Old 22nd January 2009, 01:41 PM   #6
switch007
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Thanks for the replies! It was an article we had to study for my Spanish written exam, which i did the other day and they didn't even ask about "salir del paso"! Still useful to know though, thanks everyone.
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