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Old 19th August 2010, 06:11 PM   #1
Stephen
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Default What accents are considered vulgar in Spain?

If this article is anything to go by the accent of Andalucia is looked down upon in the rest of Spain.

http://www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2010/0...282215450.html

In England the West Midlands/Birmingham accent is possibly the most scorned.
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Old 19th August 2010, 06:25 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
If this article is anything to go by the accent of Andalucia is looked down upon in the rest of Spain.

http://www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2010/0...282215450.html

In England the West Midlands/Birmingham accent is possibly the most scorned.
I read an article a few years ago where some researches had found that (all things being equal) people with a Birmingham accent were much less likely to be offered jobs.
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Old 20th August 2010, 07:29 AM   #3
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[QUOTE=Stephen;91432]
Quote:
If this article is anything to go by the accent of Andalucia is looked down upon in the rest of Spain.

http://www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2010/0...282215450.html
I do not think it is anything to do with accents, it is just political rivalry. "Trini", the health Minister is going to go for the presidency of the Comunidad de Madrid. She is from Málaga and that chappy, saying what he said I do not think it had to do anything about the accent, but that she is not from Madrid and should not go for the Madrid elections. She certainly would not dare to go for Cataluña or the Basque country or even Galicia as she would not have a chance.

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In England the West Midlands/Birmingham accent is possibly the most scorned.
Really? I always thought scouse was the most scorned.
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Old 20th August 2010, 10:04 AM   #4
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I don't know if it's scorned exactly but I personally find the Glasgow accent very difficult although years of listening to footballers from there does mean that I do at least get what they're saying. Usually.
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Old 20th August 2010, 11:58 AM   #5
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I don't know if it's scorned exactly but I personally find the Glasgow accent very difficult although years of listening to footballers from there does mean that I do at least get what they're saying. Usually.
Agreed I wouldn't say scorned but when looking to employ if an accent reduces communication ability then c'est la vie.

Last week in Asturias the taxi driver taking us to the airport instantly noticed my wife's andalucian accent despite her having lived in Madrid for more than 25 years. Guess it is one of those accents that is hard to lose - bit like glaswegian I think

Also Pilar (the wife) having heard Ben on a podcast for the first time thinks his English accent is non existent. Is that due to Oxford having a neutral accent in general??

Finally, sorry rabbiting here:

Has anyone else had trouble explaning to the likes of my 6 year old Madrillana niece why the fox on Dave thinks 'stew' is a great collective noun for rabbits

Last edited by SrCandas; 20th August 2010 at 12:03 PM.
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Old 20th August 2010, 10:00 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Pippa View Post

I do not think it is anything to do with accents, it is just political rivalry. "Trini", the health Minister is going to go for the presidency of the Comunidad de Madrid. She is from Málaga and that chappy, saying what he said I do not think it had to do anything about the accent, but that she is not from Madrid and should not go for the Madrid elections. She certainly would not dare to go for Cataluña or the Basque country or even Galicia as she would not have a chance.
I live in Barcelona and I don’t think things are exactly what you’re saying.

President of Generalitat of Cataluña, el ínclito Montilla, is an andalucian from Córdoba and he speaks a catalan absolutely ‘macarrónico’. Never mind too much…

And a time ago the PSC party, socialist, they said if they presented a ‘sofa’ like candidate to mayor of Barcelona, they would win anyway… but (fortunately) nowdays if they presented al mismísimo JesusChrist speaking a perfect catalan they would lose surely.

Things here are not so ‘balck and white’ and simple like so many of you in the ‘rest of spain’ claim they are.

The gallego accent is looked down a little, por cateto y pueblerino, but these things are very subjective and depend on the place.

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Old 21st August 2010, 03:24 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by SrCandas View Post
Agreed I wouldn't say scorned but when looking to employ if an accent reduces communication ability then c'est la vie.

Last week in Asturias the taxi driver taking us to the airport instantly noticed my wife's andalucian accent despite her having lived in Madrid for more than 25 years. Guess it is one of those accents that is hard to lose - bit like glaswegian I think

Also Pilar (the wife) having heard Ben on a podcast for the first time thinks his English accent is non existent. Is that due to Oxford having a neutral accent in general??
Well, to give you a foreigner's point of view, to me Ben has an extremely heavy British accent; even when he's speaking Spanish I can hear it coloring his vowels. It may be neutral to you, though, just as Gen. Am. counts as "no accent" to me (meaning no obvious regional variation-- you could be from anywhere in the US).

As an aside; it took me a while to hear it, but even hispanic Americans in El Paso who are bilingual born & raised still have an American accent in Spanish -- I can somewhat hear the difference between them and true Mexicans on radio commercials and announcements, even when they're both going at warp speed. Conversely, when they speak English, many have a "hispanic" accent, which oddly isn't really like how a Mexican who speaks English as a second language sounds -- although you can hear that it's phonetically influenced by Spanish. Even more oddly, one of the heaviest ones I ever heard was on a girl who didn't speak any Spanish at all -- that was just how people talk in Silver City, NM.

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Old 21st August 2010, 03:27 PM   #8
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Perhaps, sonically, the grass is greener on the other side, but I find the castillian spanish in Spain to sound more elegant and precise, if not beautiful than the spanish variations I commonly hear in the US. I understand the spanish in the Americas is inherited from the Andalusians who comprised most of the explorers to the Americas. When I hear a spaniard speak, other than my father, my ears perk up.
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Old 21st August 2010, 07:07 PM   #9
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I do not think that the Andalusian accent is looked down upon in the rest of Spain, and it is definitely not considered vulgar. It is, however, the "official" accent that many people fake when they try to sound funny, as Andalusians are often stereotyped as a jocund and merry folk.

Like in the rest of the languages, regional dialects in Spanish present a lot of varieties. Any person with a thick rural accent, for instance, no matter what his regional dialect is, may indeed be looked down by more educated people.

As for this spokesperson of the Popular Party considering that Trinidad Jiménez has no chances to become the Mayor of Madrid because of her accent, it is absolutely nonsense. Not many years ago, Álvarez del Manzano, the very candidate of the PP, was chosen as mayor of Madrid for several consecutive terms despite being from Seville. He still speaks with an Andalusian accent, albeit not very strong. In any case, his parlance is not that of your regular Madrileño.
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Old 22nd August 2010, 02:06 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Legazpi View Post
I read an article a few years ago where some researches had found that (all things being equal) people with a Birmingham accent were much less likely to be offered jobs.
I've just watched the "Autoglass" ad, which goes something like this:

Hi, I'm Gavin from Autoglass (brummy accent) (call us when you notice a chip in your windscreen.........)

The ad was aired for about 2 years and used to always annoy me, I didn't have too much of an issue with Gavin's tone. However, the customer that has just had his windscreen replaced gives a truly awful cheesy grin to wave off Gavin (and looks like he's come straight from a Just for Men ad) Anyway, they initially replaced him with a more wholesome looking customer.

Now 6 months later they've replaced Gavin with Steve who has a neutral accent.

So I'm guessing focus groups picked up on the scummy brummy?
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Old 23rd August 2010, 10:46 AM   #11
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The Murciano and Canaries accent get some stick don't they?
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Old 4th September 2010, 03:25 AM   #12
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In Andalusia there is not an only accent, there is several. For example, the inhabitants from northern Huelva don't have the same accent that the inhabitants of southern Huelva. The inhabitants fromo southern Huelva, Cadiz, Malaga, etc, have the typical closed, very marked Andalusian, but those of the north of Huelva have a Castilian accent, for anything Andalusian. Nothing. Inhabitants from Córdoba nor a very closed Andalusian accent, but you already observe some variants. And the same thing happens with those of Jaen or Almeria, that is few or nothing. To find the strong Andalusian accent it is necessary to go to Malaga, Cadiz and south of Huelva. Seville and Granada would be near

I say it because I have made the military service in Córdoba (I am not Andalusian) and I have friends from all Andalusia and other places of Spain
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Old 4th September 2010, 03:28 AM   #13
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The Murciano and Canaries accent get some stick don't they?
I don't understand what you mean, but the " murciano " and the canary are to light years, one of the other one. And the accent of Murcia is not the same in all the province, it varies. Inhabitants form northern Murcia are as the inhabitants of northern Huelva, their accent is different, more Castilian
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Old 13th September 2010, 07:37 PM   #14
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Accents in England (at least) is more about 'class' rather than region. Britons will take a decision on somebody the moment they open their mouth (Ayy oop, lad: etc). Spanish is more regional although some people can juggle 'good' and 'pueblo' Spanish. Llanito (South Cadiz/Gib) is meant to be the worst. In reality - mine's the worst. ahem.
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Old 17th September 2010, 10:00 PM   #15
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In Andalucía and Extremadura there's a term for people who try to talk posh, i.e. pronouncing every "s", or for those who go to Madrid for a few weeks and come back with a completely changed accent. It's "fisno", because these people are so desperate to sound "fino" that they even end up slipping an "s" into words where it's not required.
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Old 18th September 2010, 09:56 AM   #16
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In Andalucía and Extremadura there's a term for people who try to talk posh, i.e. pronouncing every "s", or for those who go to Madrid for a few weeks and come back with a completely changed accent. It's "fisno", because these people are so desperate to sound "fino" that they even end up slipping an "s" into words where it's not required.
We get something similar in England. Sometimes people who come from a region where the "h" is dropped try to be posh and end up adding an "h" to the beginning of a word that doesn't start with that letter.
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Old 19th September 2010, 01:18 AM   #17
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I can't think of any equivalent in American English, where accents occasionally are associated with social status or identity, but more often are just thought of as regional variation.

There was a scene in The Departed where Marky Mark accuses Leo DiCaprio of switching accents -- dropping his R's with his poorer relations (a mark of lower class in Massachusetts) -- but that distinction would be lost on people outside of New England (where we assume they all talk like that).
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Old 19th September 2010, 02:57 PM   #18
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Some in the US regard the southern variants as declassé (hick/hillbilly) and others regard the northern accents as snobbish. I know some consultants who have to mask their southern accents, depending on where they are client-facing.
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Old 18th October 2010, 03:19 PM   #19
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I think that the bottom line in the US and probably everywhere else is class rather than region.

In New England, a "Kennedy" accent evokes Harvard, while the "Pak ya ca in Havad yad" sounds blue collar and probably does indicate that the person grew up in a city neighborhood rather than a wealthier suburb.

A deep Maine accent can indicate a backwoods uneducated background, while a softened version just adds regional charm.

But make your assumptions at your own risk... that proud son of Southie could well have gotten his PhD and sees no need to shave his accent.
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Old 18th October 2010, 05:18 PM   #20
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I'm not sure about what accents sound vulgar in spain, however the other day I met a couple, the husband was Scottish and his wife was Spanish. When she started speaking it was kind of strange because she had a Scottish twang to her accent, and if I had spoken to her on the telephone I would have thought that she was Scottish aswell. My wife often has people asking her where she is from, I cant hear it, and I'm not sure if it's just because they see her with me, but people say that she has also picked up a bit of an accent.
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