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Old 30th April 2006, 01:34 PM   #1
Ben
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Default Podcast no. 36 - Usted y las Propinas - Transcript answers

This thread refers to Notes in Spanish podcast no.36, and its accompanying transcript and worksheet, which can be obtained here.

Last edited by Ben; 1st June 2007 at 10:00 AM.
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Old 14th May 2006, 09:10 PM   #2
kena
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Default Great show... and a little cultural sidenote

Very interesting podcast about the uses of tu and usted. It should be very useful on my trip to Spain next fall.

I'd say that in French, the use of the formal form is a little bit more widespread. At a twenty-something woman, I systematically use "vous" when speaking to strangers unless they are younger than me, including everyone in the service industry. I'd also use "vous" when talking to slightly older acquaintances, like my friends' parents, a grand-aunt, an older family friend or university teachers over 40. Basically, I'll use "tu" with anyone I'd be comfortable having a beer with, and "vous" with anyone else. And when in doubt, it's always safer to be more formal (whereas I got the feeling from the podcast that using "usted" might be perceived as cold or distant, right?)

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Old 15th May 2006, 02:30 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kena
...I got the feeling from the podcast that using "usted" might be perceived as cold or distant, right?)
Not necessarily distant and cold, certainly formal - so perhaps slightly strange for someone who expects to be on 'tu' terms with you. They will soon put you right though and won't be offended at all. At the end of the day we all have the convenience of being foreigners and so being able to get away with not getting it perfectly right every now and again
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Old 19th June 2006, 12:55 PM   #4
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Just to say, problably a bit late really, that I think the transcripts to the podcasts are great, just the thing for taking your understanding up a couple of levels. I thought I was quite literate with regard to reading and understanding Spanish, but the transcripts have quite literally opened my mind up to a new level of the language. Great stuff, keep it up.
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Old 19th June 2006, 03:05 PM   #5
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That's really great to hear, thanks!
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Old 12th March 2007, 01:12 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post
Not necessarily distant and cold, certainly formal - so perhaps slightly strange for someone who expects to be on 'tu' terms with you. They will soon put you right though and won't be offended at all. At the end of the day we all have the convenience of being foreigners and so being able to get away with not getting it perfectly right every now and again
Not a slow reader, just new to the forum:

I remember learning Spanish while living in Ecuador as an exchange student. Trying to do the right thing and learn all my conjugations I asked my host family about "vosotros" as I hadn't heard it at all in conversation. The reply from my little brother was something like "ah they only use vosotros in Spain!". Impressionable (and wanting to fit in), this seemed to make sense! So, I never learned any of the vosotros conjugations. I'm now seeing I have some work ahead of me..... .

Anyway, if I use ustedes in the forum trust me I'm not being formal (lazy maybe but not formal) ....

Chao

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Old 25th January 2008, 01:45 PM   #7
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Hola

Eschuche este podcast ayer y creo que esos temas son muy muy utiles para los extranjeros.

Hace unos anos, estaba en Montreal, en Canada, y compre una cola en una cafeteria. La camarera me traigo mi bebida a la mesa. Teni el argente exacto listo y lo di a la camarera. Cuando ella estuve parada y me miro. No sabia porque.

Despues de unos secundos, me di cuenta que ella esperaba una propina!

Yo estaba muy desconcertado y le di casi el precio de la bebida como propino.

Si solamente yo lo sabia antes!
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Old 28th January 2008, 12:44 PM   #8
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Muchas gracias por las correcciones
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Old 24th July 2006, 10:42 AM   #9
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Default 36

brother/sister in law - cuñado/cuñada
son/daughter in law - yerno/nuera

Otro podcast muy interesante y útil.

Last edited by JohnR; 24th July 2006 at 10:52 AM.
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Old 24th July 2006, 02:23 PM   #10
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I still get those confused sometimes, but amazingly, so do the Spanish!
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Old 24th July 2006, 03:01 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben
I still get those confused sometimes, but amazingly, so do the Spanish!
I made this up when working through my Spanish lessons. Hope it helps!
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Old 24th August 2006, 10:46 AM   #12
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I'm probably arriving at the party fashionably late, but having already been a big fan of the NIS Podcasts for a few months now, I downloaded my first transcript for this particular edition the other day, and can definitely say it's well worth it. I avoided them in the past, because I'm bone idle by nature and I knew that, if I had a written script available, I would just use it as a mental-crutch to avoid having to work hard to comprehend the spoken Spanish in the Podcast with no notes. (Simply putting the script to one side doesn't figure in my capabilities as I'm far too weak-willed ). My listening comprehension has been slow to improve in the past because I've "cheated" like this with other resources, such the the Piensa en Español audio magazines that I've had a subscription to over the last year (which incidentally, is desperately expensive for UK subscribers).

With the NIS podcasts, I mistakenly thought I'd have the same problem, but I have to say that I've learned plenty of cool stuff already, and have now downloaded the "Bodas en España" transcript too. My plan now therefore, is to carry on listening to the podcasts as soon as they are made available, and then only buy the transcript a week or so later, when I've made every effort to comprehend as much as I'm ever going to do without written help. That way I get the double-whammy of stretching my listening skills right to their limit (the only way to improve), but the bonus of not having any ongoing gaps where I struggle to understand a particular phrase no matter how many times I listen.

Well done on producing such a great resouce at such a good price! I thorougly recommend them to anyone reading who might not have tried them yet.
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Old 24th August 2006, 11:04 AM   #13
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Thank you very much! It really is great to hear that they are so useful.
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Old 16th October 2010, 10:25 PM   #14
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Default nada de nada

Cuando Ben y Marina hablan de las propinas Ben dice "nada de nada."

Nada de nada es simplemente "nothing" o algo mas?

Gracias!
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Old 18th October 2010, 07:59 AM   #15
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'Nada de nada' is nothing, but very emphasized!
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